Skip to main content

Classics and Emerging Classics

To help our readers navigate the tremendous breadth of the PSNet Collection, AHRQ PSNet editors and advisors have given the designation of “Classic” to review articles, empirical studies, government and stakeholder reports, commentaries, and books of lasting importance to the patient safety field. These items have the potential to impact how providers approach care practice and are regularly referenced in the literature. More information on the selection process.

 

The “Emerging Classics” designation identifies those resources that may not have met the level of a “Classic” yet due to limited citation in the published literature or in the level of impact/contribution to the environment, but these are resources which our patient safety subject matter experts believe have the potential to drive change in the field.

Popular Classics

Huang SS, Septimus E, Kleinman K, et al. N Engl J Med. 2013;368.

Healthcare associated infection is a leading cause of preventable illness and death. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a virulent, multi-drug resistant infection increasingly seen across healthcare settings. This pragmatic,... Read More

All Classics and Emerging Classics (867)

1 - 3 of 3 Results
Meisenberg BR, Grover J, Campbell C, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1:e182908.
Opioid deaths are a major public health and patient safety hazard. This multimodal, health care system-level intervention to reduce opioid overprescribing consisted of changes to the electronic health record, patient education, and provider education and oversight. Opioid prescribing decreased substantially (58%) systemwide with no discernible decrement in patient satisfaction.
Chang B, Kaye AD, Diaz JH, et al. J Patient Saf. 2018;14:9-16.
This retrospective study of the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry database determined that complications were more common for procedures performed in the operating room compared to procedures performed outside the operating room. This finding may be due to adverse selection, in which patients at higher risk for complications are intentionally treated in the operating room environment. A past WebM&M commentary discussed an adverse event related to a procedure at an outpatient center.
Rothschild JM. JAMA. 2009;302.
Limitations on housestaff duty hours were implemented with the intent of protecting patients by reducing errors made by fatigued residents. Indeed, prior studies have shown that sleep-deprived residents are more prone to committing errors and inadvertently sustaining needlestick injuries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to the effect of fatigue on attending physicians. Conducted at a single academic medical center, this study evaluated the relationship between sleep deprivation (defined as having operated the night before the scheduled procedure) and complication rates for a range of surgical, obstetric, and gynecologic procedures. There was no overall link between fatigue and complications, but the complication rate was increased for surgeons who had the opportunity to sleep less than 6 hours. Other studies have found that fatigue is influenced by many factors other than hours worked, and therefore further reductions in shift length (as called for in a recent Institute of Medicine report) may not significantly improve patient safety.