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Classics and Emerging Classics

To help our readers navigate the tremendous breadth of the PSNet Collection, AHRQ PSNet editors and advisors have given the designation of “Classic” to review articles, empirical studies, government and stakeholder reports, commentaries, and books of lasting importance to the patient safety field. These items have the potential to impact how providers approach care practice and are regularly referenced in the literature. More information on the selection process.

 

The “Emerging Classics” designation identifies those resources that may not have met the level of a “Classic” yet due to limited citation in the published literature or in the level of impact/contribution to the environment, but these are resources which our patient safety subject matter experts believe have the potential to drive change in the field.

Popular Classics

Huang SS, Septimus E, Kleinman K, et al. N Engl J Med. 2013;368.

Healthcare associated infection is a leading cause of preventable illness and death. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a virulent, multi-drug resistant infection increasingly seen across healthcare settings. This pragmatic,... Read More

All Classics and Emerging Classics (867)

Published Date
PSNet Publication Date
1 - 20 of 299 Results
Edmondson AC. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; 2019. ISBN: 9781119477266.
Psychological safety is foundational to sharing ideas, reporting errors, and raising concerns. This book provides a framework for leaders to develop psychological safety in their organization. The author argues that it is imperative to facilitate an environment that enables staff to freely exhibit the candor, comfort, and openness needed to sustain high performance and innovation.
Carayon P, Wooldridge A, Hose B-Z, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1862-1869.
System and process weaknesses can hinder safe patient care. This commentary raises awareness of human factors engineering as a key opportunity for enhancing patient safety. The authors provide recommendations to drive adoption and spread of human factors strategies through targeted education, clinician–engineer partnerships, and coordinated improvement efforts.
Nickel WK, Weinberger SE, Guze PA, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2018;169:796-799.
Patient and family engagement can enhance both individual safety and organizational improvement efforts. This position paper advocates for patients and families to be active partners in all aspects of their care, treated with respect and dignity, engaged in improving health care systems, and directly involved in education of health care professionals. The piece also provides strategies to employ these recommendations in the daily practice.
Kang H, Wang J, Yao B, et al. JAMIA Open. 2018;2:179-186.
Improved health information technology (IT) event databases are necessary to better understand safety events associated with health IT, but such databases are lacking. This study describes the use of the Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database as a source to identify adverse events related to health IT. Frequently identified contributing factors to such events included hardware and software problems as well as user interface design issues.
Sloane DM, Smith HL, McHugh MD, et al. Med Care. 2018;56:1001-1008.
Prior research suggests that improved nursing resources may be associated with decreased mortality and adverse events. However, less is known about how changes to nursing resources in the inpatient setting may affect quality and safety over time. In this study involving 737 hospitals and survey data from nurses obtained in 2006 and 2016, researchers found that after adjusting for numerous factors, better nursing resources in terms of work environment, staffing, and education was associated with improvement in quality and patient safety outcomes. A PSNet perspective discussed the impact of nursing resources on patient safety.
Commentary
Emerging Classic
Coiera E. Lancet. 2018;392:2331-2332.
Artificial intelligence can improve practice by making synthesized data available in real time to inform frontline decision-making. This commentary describes factors clinicians should consider as artificial intelligence becomes more prevalent in health care and discusses how this technology can enable clinicians to focus on helping patients navigate complex care choices.
Ratwani RM, Savage E, Will A, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1752-1759.
Although health information technology has been shown to improve patient safety, problems with implementation and user interface design persist. Unintended consequences associated with the use of electronic health record (EHR) and computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems remain a safety concern. Pediatric patients may be particularly vulnerable to medication errors associated with EHR usability. Researchers examined 9000 safety event reports over a 5-year period from 3 pediatric health care facilities and found that 5079 events were related to the EHR and medication. Of these, 3243 identified EHR usability as contributing to the event, 609 of which reached the patient. Incorrect dosing was the most common medication error detected across the three facilities. A previous WebM&M commentary highlighted the unintended consequences of CPOE.
Shortliffe EH, Sepúlveda MJ. JAMA. 2018;320:2199-2200.
Clinical decision support on the front line of care harbors both potential benefits and barriers to effective care delivery. This commentary outlines system challenges such as complexity and poor communication that hinder reliable adoption and use of clinical decision support. The authors highlight the need for research and evaluation models to help bring clinical decision support safely and effectively into daily health care work.
Vento S, Cainelli F, Vallone A. World J Clin Cases. 2018;6:406-409.
Malpractice concerns can influence treatment decisions as clinicians seek to avoid errors of omission. This commentary reviews factors that contribute to defensive medicine, underscores the role the blame culture has in perpetuating this behavior, and discusses the costs to patients, physicians, and health systems.
Bates DW, Singh H. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1736-1743.
The release of the Institute of Medicine's To Err Is Human in 1999 represented a seminal moment in patient safety and is considered by many to have launched the modern patient safety movement. The report highlighted the incidence of medical errors and preventable deaths in the United States and catalyzed research to identify interventions for improvement. The authors reflect on progress since its publication and suggest that while many effective interventions have been developed for addressing safety challenges such as hospital-acquired infections and medication errors, successful implementation of these solutions remains difficult, and improvement in other areas has been less consistent. In addition, new safety challenges have emerged in the last 20 years including those related to ambulatory care and diagnostic error. The authors conclude that preventable harm remains significant and advocate for enhanced use of widely available electronic data to develop improved interventions for what they foresee may be a Golden Era of swift progress in patient safety. A PSNet perspective reflected on patient safety progress in surgery. The Moore Foundation provides free access to this article.
Yu K-H, Kohane IS. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28:238-241.
Use of artificial intelligence (AI) and computer algorithms as tools to improve diagnosis have both risks and benefits. This commentary explores challenges to implementing AI systems at the front line of care in a safe manner and identifies weaknesses of advanced computing systems that influence their reliability.
Boet S, Etherington N, Larrigan S, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28:327-337.
Teamwork training enhances health care team performance, especially in crisis situations. This systematic review identified 13 tools for assessing teamwork in high-stress settings, most of which were designed for the emergency department. A past PSNet perspective explored insights learned from experience with the AHRQ-supported teamwork training program, TeamSTEPPS.
Meisenberg BR, Grover J, Campbell C, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1:e182908.
Opioid deaths are a major public health and patient safety hazard. This multimodal, health care system-level intervention to reduce opioid overprescribing consisted of changes to the electronic health record, patient education, and provider education and oversight. Opioid prescribing decreased substantially (58%) systemwide with no discernible decrement in patient satisfaction.
Mianda S, Voce A. BMC Health Serv Res. 2018;18:747.
Clinical leadership training and teamwork training both augment the safety of maternity care. This systematic review found that most leadership training in maternity settings used a work-based learning approach rather than simulation or classroom interventions. The authors emphasize the importance of tailoring leadership interventions to low- and middle-income countries, where this training is less common.
Bates DW, Landman A, Levine DM. JAMA. 2018;320:1975-1976.
Mobile health care applications are increasingly being developed and marketed to patients for self-care and diagnosis, with little oversight as to their effectiveness or safety. This commentary outlines four key issues that must be addressed to improve the safety of medical applications.
Murphy DR, Meyer AN, Sittig DF, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28:151-159.
Identifying and measuring diagnostic error remains an ongoing challenge. Trigger tools are frequently used in health care to detect adverse events. Researchers describe the Safer Dx Trigger Tools Framework as it applies to the development and implementation of electronic trigger tools that use electronic health record data to detect and measure diagnostic error. The authors suggest that by identifying possible diagnostic errors, these tools will help elucidate contributing factors and opportunities for improvement. They also suggest that, if used prospectively, such tools might enable clinicians to take preventive action. However, to design and implement these electronic trigger tools successfully, health systems will need to invest in the appropriate staff and resources. A past PSNet perspective discussed ongoing challenges associated with diagnostic error.
Powers EM, Shiffman RN, Melnick ER, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018;25:1556-1566.
Although hard-stop alerts can improve safety, they have been shown to result in unintended consequences such as delays in care. This systematic review suggests that while implementing hard stops can lead to improved health and process outcomes, end-user involvement is essential to inform design and appropriate workflow integration.
Croskerry P. Med Teach. 2018;40:803-808.
Clinical reasoning is a complex process that can be influenced by numerous factors. This commentary reviews major factors that affect clinical reasoning such as teamwork, decision-maker characteristics, and environmental conditions. The author suggests that an adaptive rather than linear decision-making approach would support reasoning improvements to reduce diagnostic error.
Papadopoulos I, Koulouglioti C, Ali S. Contemp Nurse. 2018;54:425-442.
Robotics are increasingly used to assist in both complicated and routine activities in health care. Although safety hazards associated with robotic technologies have been explored in surgery, risks related to purely assistive devices is understudied. This review highlights clinician perspectives regarding assistive robots in health care and highlights infection control and reliability issues as concerns associated with their use.
Schiff GD, Martin SA, Eidelman DH, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2018;169:643-645.
Safe diagnosis is a complex challenge that requires multidisciplinary approaches to achieve lasting improvement. The authors worked with a multidisciplinary panel to build a 10-element framework outlining steps that support conservative diagnosis. Recommendation highlights include a renewed focus on history-taking and physician examination, as discussed in a PSNet perspective. They also emphasize the importance of continuity between clinicians and patients to build trust and foster timely diagnosis. Taken together with recommendations for enhanced communication between specialist and generalist clinicians and more judicious use of diagnostic testing, this report is a comprehensive approach to reducing overdiagnosis and overtreatment.