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Continuing Education

What is PSNet Continuing Education?

PSNet Continuing Education offerings include WebM&M Spotlight Cases and Commentaries, which are certified for Continuing Medical Education/ Continuing Education Units (CME/CEU) and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credit through the University of California, Davis (UCD) Health Office of Continuing Medical Education. 
 

Each WebM&M Spotlight Case and Commentary is certified for the AMA PRA Category 1™ and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) through the American Board of Internal Medicine by the Office of Continuing Medical Education (OCME) at UCD, Health. 
 

Learn more about how to earn credit from UCD 

UCD's CME Security and Privacy 

 


How does it work?

Earn CME or MOC credit and trainee certification by successfully completing quizzes based on Cases & Commentaries. 

  • Individuals have two attempts at each quiz to achieve a passing score of 80% or higher in order to earn credit.
  • If you fail a quiz twice, the quiz will become unavailable, but the Spotlight case will be available as read-only.
  • Spotlight Cases older than three years continue to be available as read-only, but their associated quizzes have been disabled.
  • If you have questions specifically regarding University of California San Francisco (UCSF) CME/CEU, including registration, accreditation, or content, please email us at info@ocme.ucsf.edu.

New WebM&M Spotlight Cases

All WebM&M Spotlight Cases (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2 WebM&M Spotlight Cases
Karl Steinberg, MD, CMD, HMDC and Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD | December 18, 2019
A 63-year-old woman with hematemesis was admitted by a 2nd year medical resident for an endoscopy. The resident did not spend adequate time discussing her code status and subsequently, made a series of errors that failed to honor the patient’s preferences and could have resulted in an adverse outcome for this relatively healthy woman.
F. Daniel Duffy, MD; Christine K. Cassel, MD| October 1, 2007
Following surgery, a woman on a patient-controlled analgesia pump is found to be lethargic and incoherent, with a low respiratory rate. The nurse contacted the attending physician, who dismisses the patient's symptoms and chastises the nurse for the late call.