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Innovations

The PSNet Innovations Exchange highlights pioneering advances that can improve patient safety. PSNet innovations are defined as “new or altered products, tools, services, processes, systems, policies, organizational structures, or business models implemented to improve or enhance quality of care and reduce harm.” The PSNet Innovations Exchange includes recently developed and tested innovations, updates to existing innovations that have been featured in AHRQ’s Health Care Innovations Exchange, as well as “emerging innovations,” which are original approaches to patient safety recently published in the peer-reviewed literature.

Read more about how PSNet Innovations can be used.

PSNet innovations can be used to:

  • Identify new tactics, strategies, tools, or approaches that could be implemented by a broader audience
  • Learn about recent innovations with promising early results
  • Consider conditions that support the successful implementation or sustainment of a new or emerging innovation

Future innovations will be curated by subject matter experts based on their impact on the provision of health care.

Latest Innovations

Medical residents, alongside interns, nurses and attending physicians, are uniquely positioned to identify safety concerns because they are on the front lines of patient care.1 Residents can bring a fresh perspective that is informed by their cross... Read More

Emerging Innovations

All Innovations (36)

1 - 6 of 6 Results

Studies show that home visits to patients recently discharged from the hospital can help prevent unnecessary readmission.1 Providing continuing care instructions to patients in their homes—where they may be less overwhelmed than in the hospital—may also be a key mechanism for preventing readmission.2 Home visit clinicians and technicians can note any health concerns in the home environment and help patients understand their care plan in the context of that environment.2

The Behavioral Health Vital Signs (BHVS) screener is a patient questionnaire input into the electronic health record for depressive symptoms, alcohol and substance use, and interpersonal violence. Widespread staff education and a standardized workflow were developed to ensure that BHVS was implemented in all primary care clinics within the San Francisco Health Network.

Multidisciplinary teams at the University of Kansas Hospital sought to improve patient outcomes from obstetric emergencies by rehearsing team responses in simulations to emergent situations that can occur during a delivery. Using the PRactical Obstetric MultiProfessional Training (or PROMPT) curriculum, teams rehearsed flexible emergency care scenarios in order to achieve an optimal response, and then used this experience to improve their response to a real emergency.

Social worker/nurse practitioner teams collaborate with a larger interdisciplinary team and primary care physicians to develop and implement individualized care plans for seniors and other high-risk patients. The social worker/nurse practitioner team also proactively manages and coordinates the patient's care on an ongoing basis through regular telephone and in-person contact with both patients and providers.

Formerly known as the Antenatal and Neonatal Guidelines, Education and Learning System (ANGELS), the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) High-Risk Pregnancy Program links clinicians and patients across the state with UAMS, where the vast majority of the state's high-risk pregnancy services, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, and prenatal genetic counselors are located.

Children's Hospital Colorado requires clinicians in all inpatient and outpatient facilities to confirm any order entered into its computerized order entry system through a popup verification screen that includes a prominent photograph of the patient, along with other key information such as age and gender. The goal is to capture the clinician's attention and force him or her to verify that the order has been entered into the correct patient's chart.