Skip to main content

Innovations

The PSNet Innovations Exchange highlights pioneering advances that can improve patient safety. PSNet innovations are defined as “new or altered products, tools, services, processes, systems, policies, organizational structures, or business models implemented to improve or enhance quality of care and reduce harm.” The PSNet Innovations Exchange includes recently developed and tested innovations, updates to existing innovations that have been featured in AHRQ’s Health Care Innovations Exchange, as well as “emerging innovations,” which are original approaches to patient safety recently published in the peer-reviewed literature.

Read more about how PSNet Innovations can be used.

PSNet innovations can be used to:

  • Identify new tactics, strategies, tools, or approaches that could be implemented by a broader audience
  • Learn about recent innovations with promising early results
  • Consider conditions that support the successful implementation or sustainment of a new or emerging innovation

Future innovations will be curated by subject matter experts based on their impact on the provision of health care.

Latest Innovations

Medical residents, alongside interns, nurses and attending physicians, are uniquely positioned to identify safety concerns because they are on the front lines of patient care.1 Residents can bring a fresh perspective that is informed by their cross... Read More

Emerging Innovations

All Innovations (36)

1 - 13 of 13 Results

An increasing volume of patients presenting for acute care can create a need for more ICU beds and intensivists and lead to longer wait times and boarding of critically ill patients in the emergency department (ED).1 Data suggest that boarding of critically ill patients for more than 6 hours in the emergency department leads to poorer outcomes and increased mortality.2,3 To address this issue, University of Michigan Health, part of Michigan Medicine, developed an ED-based ICU, the first of its kind, in its 1,000-bed adult hospital.

The Revised Safer Dx Instrument provides a standardized list of questions to help users retrospectively identify and assess the likelihood of a missed diagnosis in a healthcare episode. Results of the assessment are intended for use in system-level safety improvement efforts, clinician feedback, and patient safety research.

The handshake antimicrobial stewardship program (HS-ASP) was developed and implemented at Children’s Hospital Colorado (CHCO). In 2014, the CHOC HS-ASP team began labeling specific interventions as “Great Catches” which were considered to have altered, or had the potential to alter, the patient’s trajectory of care. CHOC researchers used these "Great Catches" to identify potential diagnostic errors.

The Patient Safe-D(ischarge) program used standardized tools to educate patients about their discharge needs, test understanding of those needs, and improve medication reconciliation at admission and discharge. A quasi-randomized controlled trial of the program found that it significantly increased patients' understanding and knowledge of their diagnoses, treatment, and required follow-up care.

The Hospital at Homesm program provides hospital-level care (including daily physician and nurse visits, diagnostic testing, treatment, and other support) in a patient's home as a full substitute for acute hospital care for selected conditions that are common among seniors. Studies have shown that the Hospital at Home program results in lower length of stay, costs, readmission rates, and complications than does traditional inpatient care, and surveys indicate higher levels of patient and family member satisfaction than with traditional care.

Trauma staff at The Alfred Hospital use a computerized decision support system to guide the care of patients during the critical first 60 minutes of resuscitation. Known as the Trauma Reception and Resuscitation System (TR&R®), this program generates prompts based on more than 40 algorithms and real-time clinical data, including patient vital signs and information entered by a trauma nurse. Displayed on a large overhead monitor, these prompts are used by clinicians to direct the care of trauma patients and to facilitate documentation and communication.