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Innovations

The PSNet Innovations Exchange highlights pioneering advances that can improve patient safety. PSNet innovations are defined as “new or altered products, tools, services, processes, systems, policies, organizational structures, or business models implemented to improve or enhance quality of care and reduce harm.” The PSNet Innovations Exchange includes recently developed and tested innovations, updates to existing innovations that have been featured in AHRQ’s Health Care Innovations Exchange, as well as “emerging innovations,” which are original approaches to patient safety recently published in the peer-reviewed literature.

Read more about how PSNet Innovations can be used.

PSNet innovations can be used to:

  • Identify new tactics, strategies, tools, or approaches that could be implemented by a broader audience
  • Learn about recent innovations with promising early results
  • Consider conditions that support the successful implementation or sustainment of a new or emerging innovation

Future innovations will be curated by subject matter experts based on their impact on the provision of health care.

Latest Innovations

Medical residents, alongside interns, nurses and attending physicians, are uniquely positioned to identify safety concerns because they are on the front lines of patient care.1 Residents can bring a fresh perspective that is informed by their cross... Read More

Emerging Innovations

All Innovations (36)

Published Date
PSNet Publication Date
1 - 3 of 3 Results

Studies show that home visits to patients recently discharged from the hospital can help prevent unnecessary readmission.1 Providing continuing care instructions to patients in their homes—where they may be less overwhelmed than in the hospital—may also be a key mechanism for preventing readmission.2 Home visit clinicians and technicians can note any health concerns in the home environment and help patients understand their care plan in the context of that environment.2

The MOQI seeks to reduce avoidable hospitalization among nursing home residents by placing an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within the care team with the goal of early identification of resident decline. In addition to the APRN, the MOQI involves nursing home teams focused on use of tools to better detect acute changes in resident status, smoother transitions between hospitals and nursing homes, end-of-life care, and use of health information technology to facilitate communication with peers. As a result of the innovation, resident hospitalizations declined.

The team at Geisinger sought to develop an outpatient addiction medicine specialty program that incorporated medication-assisted treatment (MAT), peer support, and connection to community counseling services that also uses data-driven insights to monitor and improve patient outcomes. As a result of this program, they have been able to reduce all-cause mortality among these patients, increase patient engagement in substance use disorder treatment, and have seen a reduction in the prescription quantities of controlled substances.