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Innovations

The PSNet Innovations Exchange highlights pioneering advances that can improve patient safety. PSNet innovations are defined as “new or altered products, tools, services, processes, systems, policies, organizational structures, or business models implemented to improve or enhance quality of care and reduce harm.” The PSNet Innovations Exchange includes recently developed and tested innovations, updates to existing innovations that have been featured in AHRQ’s Health Care Innovations Exchange, as well as “emerging innovations,” which are original approaches to patient safety recently published in the peer-reviewed literature.

Read more about how PSNet Innovations can be used.

PSNet innovations can be used to:

  • Identify new tactics, strategies, tools, or approaches that could be implemented by a broader audience
  • Learn about recent innovations with promising early results
  • Consider conditions that support the successful implementation or sustainment of a new or emerging innovation

Future innovations will be curated by subject matter experts based on their impact on the provision of health care.

Latest Innovations

Medical residents, alongside interns, nurses and attending physicians, are uniquely positioned to identify safety concerns because they are on the front lines of patient care.1 Residents can bring a fresh perspective that is informed by their cross... Read More

Emerging Innovations

All Innovations (35)

1 - 9 of 9 Results

Obtaining a best possible medication history is the cornerstone of medication reconciliation but can be resource-intensive. This comparison study assessed the impact of virtual pharmacy technicians (vCPhT) obtaining best possible medication histories from patients admitted to the hospital from the emergency department. 

The handshake antimicrobial stewardship program (HS-ASP) was developed and implemented at Children’s Hospital Colorado (CHCO). In 2014, the CHOC HS-ASP team began labeling specific interventions as “Great Catches” which were considered to have altered, or had the potential to alter, the patient’s trajectory of care. CHOC researchers used these "Great Catches" to identify potential diagnostic errors.