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Diagnostic error experiences of patients and families with limited English-language health literacy or disadvantaged socioeconomic position in a cross-sectional US population-based survey.

Bell SK, Dong J, Ngo L, et al. Diagnostic error experiences of patients and families with limited English-language health literacy or disadvantaged socioeconomic position in a cross-sectional US population-based survey. BMJ Qual Saf. Epub 2022 Feb 4. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs-2021-013937

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February 16, 2022
Bell SK, Dong J, Ngo L, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;Epub Feb 4.

Limited English-language health literacy (LEHL) and disadvantaged socioeconomic position (dSEP) have been shown to increase risk of adverse events and near misses. Using data from the 2017 Institute for Healthcare Improvement-National Patient Safety Foundation study, researchers found, while respondents with LEHL or dSEP experienced diagnostic errors at the same rate as their counterparts, they were more likely to report unique contributing factors and more long-term emotional, physical, and financial harm.

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Bell SK, Dong J, Ngo L, et al. Diagnostic error experiences of patients and families with limited English-language health literacy or disadvantaged socioeconomic position in a cross-sectional US population-based survey. BMJ Qual Saf. Epub 2022 Feb 4. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs-2021-013937