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Study
November 7, 2007

Effect of a rapid response system for patients in shock on time to treatment and mortality during 5 years.

Sebat F, Musthafa AA, Johnson D, et al. Effect of a rapid response system for patients in shock on time to treatment and mortality during 5 years. Critical care medicine. 2007;35(11):2568-75.

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Sebat F, Musthafa AA, Johnson D, et al. Critical care medicine. 2007;35:2568-75.

Widespread implementation of rapid response systems (RRS) was designed to improve the care of clinically unstable patients. Despite their endorsement by patient safety campaigns, the effect on patient outcomes remains controversial. This study reported a reduced time to treatment for patients in shock, and a resulting decrease in mortality, after implementation of a hospital-wide RRS. Investigators compared outcomes 2.5 years before and 5 years after implementation of their RRS in demonstrating the benefits. Whereas a past study showed similar outcome benefits using an RRS led by trained physician assistants, this study utilized a resource-intensive response team that included an emergency physician and an intensivist, in addition to an intensive care nurse, respiratory therapist, and pharmacist.

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Sebat F, Musthafa AA, Johnson D, et al. Effect of a rapid response system for patients in shock on time to treatment and mortality during 5 years. Critical care medicine. 2007;35(11):2568-75.