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Learning from high risk industries may not be straightforward: a qualitative study of the hierarchy of risk controls approach in healthcare.

Liberati EG, Peerally MF, Dixon-Woods M. Learning from high risk industries may not be straightforward: a qualitative study of the hierarchy of risk controls approach in healthcare. Int J Qual Health Care. 2018;30(1):39-43. doi:10.1093/intqhc/mzx163.

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January 31, 2018
Liberati EG, Peerally MF, Dixon-Woods M. Int J Qual Health Care. 2018;30:39-43.

The field of patient safety has long looked to high reliability organizations like aviation or nuclear power for solutions, but it is unclear how well such approaches translate to health care settings. In this study, researchers asked clinicians to identify safety hazards from their own work and then propose solutions. After applying a systems thinking framework to clinicians' solution ideas, they found that most of the clinician-generated safety approaches would be considered ineffective by high reliability standards. The authors suggest that industrial frameworks are an imperfect match for health care settings and should be used with caution. A recent PSNet interview with the study's senior author, Mary Dixon-Woods, discusses the sociology of health care versus other industries.

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Liberati EG, Peerally MF, Dixon-Woods M. Learning from high risk industries may not be straightforward: a qualitative study of the hierarchy of risk controls approach in healthcare. Int J Qual Health Care. 2018;30(1):39-43. doi:10.1093/intqhc/mzx163.