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"They say they listen. But do they really listen?": A qualitative study of hospital doctors' experiences of organisational deafness, disconnect and denial.

Creese J, Byrne JP, Conway E, et al. “They say they listen. But do they really listen?”: A qualitative study of hospital doctors’ experiences of organisational deafness, disconnect and denial. Health Serv Manage Res. 2024;Epub May 31. doi:10.1177/09514848241254929.

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July 10, 2024
Creese J, Byrne JP, Conway E, et al. Health Serv Manage Res. 2024;Epub May 31.
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Frontline staff are routinely encouraged to report patient safety problems, but many feel discouraged by management's response, or lack thereof, and thus they stop reporting. In this study, physicians reported three major barriers to speaking up: organizational deafness, disconnect between frontline staff and managers, and management denial of issues raised. As a result, physicians experienced burnout, moral injury, and job dissatisfaction. Fostering clear feedback pathways, genuine connection between physicians and managers, and an organizational commitment to accountability may increase physician willingness to speak up about patient safety concerns.

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Creese J, Byrne JP, Conway E, et al. “They say they listen. But do they really listen?”: A qualitative study of hospital doctors’ experiences of organisational deafness, disconnect and denial. Health Serv Manage Res. 2024;Epub May 31. doi:10.1177/09514848241254929.

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