Skip to main content

Perspectives

Our Perspectives on Safety section features expert viewpoints on current themes in patient safety, including interviews and written essays published monthly. Annual Perspectives highlight vital and emerging patient safety topics.

Latest Perspectives

Georgia Galanou Luchen, Pharm. D., is the Director of Member Relations at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). In this role, she leads initiatives related to community pharmacy practitioners and their impact throughout the care... Read More

This piece discusses an expanded view of maternal and infant safety that includes the concept of whole-person care, which addresses the structural and social determinants of maternal health. Read More

James Augustine, MD, is the National Director of Prehospital Strategy at US Acute Care Solutions where he provides service as a Fire EMS Medical Director. We spoke with him about threats and concerns for patient safety for EMS when responding to a... Read More

All Perspectives (325)

Published Date
PSNet Publication Date
Perspective Type
Additional Filters
81 - 100 of 325 Results
Dr. Hirschtick is Associate Professor of Medicine at Northwestern Medicine, and the author of a number of prominent articles—many quite amusing—about the changes in medical practice wrought by information technology. We spoke with him about what it means to be a clinician in the modern era, particularly how digitization of health records has affected clinicians' notes.
Wanda Pratt is a professor in the Information School and an adjunct in Biomedical and Health Informatics in the School of Medicine at the University of Washington. We spoke with her about patient-facing technologies, including the opportunities and challenges for patient safety.
Dr. Starke is Professor of Pediatrics–Infectious Disease at Baylor College of Medicine and previously served as Infection Control Officer at Texas Children's Hospital. We spoke with him about "presenteeism" (coming to work while ill) in health care and its impact on provider and patient safety.
Dr. Gettinger is the Chief Medical Information Officer and the Executive Director of the Office of Clinical Quality and Safety for the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC). He led the development of an electronic health record (EHR) system at Dartmouth and was the senior physician leader during their transition to a vendor-based EHR. We spoke with him about safety and health information technology.
Dr. Bilimoria is the Director of the Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center of Northwestern University, which focuses on national, regional, and local quality improvement research and practical initiatives. He is also the Director of the Illinois Surgical Quality Improvement Collaborative and a Faculty Scholar at the American College of Surgeons. In the second part of a two-part interview (the earlier one concerned residency duty hours), we spoke with him about quality and safety in surgery.
Dr. Bilimoria is the Director of the Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center of Northwestern University. He is the principal investigator of the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial and a Faculty Scholar at the American College of Surgeons. We spoke with him about the FIRST trial, which examined how less restrictive duty hours affected patient outcomes and resident satisfaction. Its results informed recent changes to duty hour policies.
Michelle Mello is Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine. She conducts empirical research into issues at the intersection of law, ethics, and health policy. We spoke with her about legal issues in patient safety.
Professor Aylin is Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at Imperial College London. We spoke with him about the weekend effect in health care—the observation that patients admitted to the hospital over the weekend often have worse outcomes than those admitted during the week.
Dr. Juurlink is professor of medicine, pediatrics, and health policy at the University of Toronto, where he is also director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology. We spoke with him about the opioid epidemic and strategies to address this growing patient safety concern.
Professor Sutcliffe is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Business and Medicine at Johns Hopkins University. She studies organizational adaptability, reliability, resilience, and safety in health care. We spoke with her about high reliability in health care organizations.