Skip to main content

Perspectives

Our Perspectives on Safety section features expert viewpoints on current themes in patient safety, including interviews and written essays published monthly. Annual Perspectives highlight vital and emerging patient safety topics.

Latest Perspectives

Remle Crowe, PhD, NREMT, is the Director of Clinical and Operational Research at ESO. In her professional role, she provides strategic direction for the research mission of the organization, including oversight of a warehouse research data set of de... Read More

Michael L. Millenson is the President of Health Quality Advisors LLC, author of the critically acclaimed book Demanding Medical Excellence: Doctors and Accountability in the Information Age, and an adjunct associate professor of medicine at... Read More

Errors in medication management and administration are major threats to patient safety. This piece explores issues with opioid and nursing-sensitive medication safety as well as medication safety in older adults. Future research directions in... Read More

All Perspectives (333)

1 - 10 of 10 Results
Audrey Lyndon, RN, PhD |
This perspective examines the troubling decline in maternal health outcomes in the United States and summarizes recent national initiatives to improve safety in maternity care.
Rachel J. Stern, MD, and Urmimala Sarkar, MD |
Patient engagement is widely acknowledged as a cornerstone of patient safety. Research in 2018 demonstrates that patient engagement, when done correctly, can help health care systems identify safety hazards, regain trust after they occur, and codesign sustainable solutions.
Sumant Ranji, MD |
The toll of medical errors is often expressed in terms of mortality attributable to patient safety problems. In 2016, there was considerable debate regarding the number of patients who die due to medical errors. This Annual Perspective explores the methodological approaches to estimating mortality attributable to preventable adverse events and discusses the benefits and limitations of existing approaches.
Kiran Gupta, MD, MPH, and Audrey Lyndon, PhD |
Root cause analysis is widely accepted as a key component of patient safety programs. In 2016, the literature outlined ongoing problems with the root cause analysis process and shed light on opportunities to improve its application in health care. This Annual Perspective reviews concerns about the root cause analysis process and highlights recommendations for improvement put forth by the National Patient Safety Foundation.
Urmimala Sarkar, MD, and Kaveh Shojania, MD |
Opioids are known to be high risk medications, and concerns about patient harm from prescription opioid misuse have been increasing in the United States. This Annual Perspective summarizes research published in 2016 that explored the extent of harm from their use, described problematic prescribing practices that likely contribute to adverse events, and demonstrated some promising practices to foster safer opioid use.
Urmimala Sarkar, MD, and Kaveh Shojania, MD |
Computerized provider order entry is a cornerstone of patient safety efforts, and the increasingly widespread implementation of electronic health records has made it a standard practice in health care. This Annual Perspective summarizes novel findings and research directions in computerized provider order entry in 2015.
Clinician burnout is prevalent across health care settings and may impair clinicians' ability to maintain safe practices and detect emerging safety threats. This Annual Perspective summarizes studies published in 2015, with a particular focus on the relationship between burnout and patient safety, and interventions to address burnout among clinicians.
Christopher Moriates, MD, and Robert M. Wachter, MD |
While the patient safety world has largely embraced the concept of a just culture for many years, in 2015 the discussion moved toward tackling some of the specifics and many gray areas that must be addressed to realize this ideal. This Annual Perspective reviews the context of the "no blame" movement and the recent shift toward a framework of a just culture, which incorporates appropriate accountability in health care.