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Perspectives

Our Perspectives on Safety section features expert viewpoints on current themes in patient safety, including interviews and written essays published monthly. Annual Perspectives highlight vital and emerging patient safety topics.

Latest Perspectives

Remle Crowe, PhD, NREMT, is the Director of Clinical and Operational Research at ESO. In her professional role, she provides strategic direction for the research mission of the organization, including oversight of a warehouse research data set of de... Read More

Michael L. Millenson is the President of Health Quality Advisors LLC, author of the critically acclaimed book Demanding Medical Excellence: Doctors and Accountability in the Information Age, and an adjunct associate professor of medicine at... Read More

Errors in medication management and administration are major threats to patient safety. This piece explores issues with opioid and nursing-sensitive medication safety as well as medication safety in older adults. Future research directions in... Read More

All Perspectives (333)

1 - 16 of 16 Results
Dr. Saria is the John C. Malone Assistant Professor of computer science, statistics, and health policy at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on developing next generation diagnostic, surveillance, and treatment planning tools to reduce adverse events and individualize health care for complex diseases. We spoke with her about artificial intelligence in health care.
Rachel J. Stern, MD, and Urmimala Sarkar, MD |
Patient engagement is widely acknowledged as a cornerstone of patient safety. Research in 2018 demonstrates that patient engagement, when done correctly, can help health care systems identify safety hazards, regain trust after they occur, and codesign sustainable solutions.
Dr. Graber founded the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine and the journal, Diagnosis. We spoke with him about the recent National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine) Improving Diagnosis in Health Care report, and about diagnostic errors more generally.
Dr. Topol is Director of Scripps Translational Science Institute and Editor-in-Chief of Medscape. We spoke with him about his book, The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands.
Dr. Arora is Director of GME Clinical Learning Environment Innovation and Assistant Dean for Scholarship and Discovery at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. We spoke with her about the intersection of health information technology and patient safety.
Dr. Cassel, President and CEO of the National Quality Forum (NQF), is a leading expert in geriatric medicine, medical ethics, and quality of care. We spoke with her about NQF's work in developing and utilizing quality measures to improve safety in health care.
Dr. Sarkar is an associate professor of medicine at UCSF whose research has focused on ambulatory patient safety, including missed and delayed diagnosis, adverse drug events, and monitoring failures for outpatients with chronic diseases. We spoke with her about patient safety in the ambulatory setting.
Barry M. Manuel, MD; Jack L. McCarthy; William Berry, MD, MPH; Kathy Dwyer |
In 1990, a Harvard-based research team reported the incidence of medical errors in the state of New York, based on the hospital discharge analysis of 30,121 cases.
David P. Sklar, MD; Cameron Crandall, MD |
Emergency medicine has evolved from a location, with variably trained and experienced providers ("the ER"), to a discipline with a well-defined knowledge base and skill set that focus on the diagnosis and care of undifferentiated acute problems.(1) The importance of rapid diagnosis and treatment of serious conditions (e.g., myocardial infarction, stroke, trauma, and sepsis) has made timeliness not simply a determinant of patient satisfaction but also a significant safety and quality concern—delays in care can be deadly.(2) Emergency physicians (EPs) have identified delays caused by crowding from boarding of admitted patients as their most significant safety problem.(3) We present a model for understanding emergency department (ED) patient safety and identify solutions by deconstructing care into three realms: individual provider, patient, and environmental system (Table).
Pat Croskerry, MD, PhD, is a professor in emergency medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Trained as an experimental psychologist, Dr. Croskerry went on to become an emergency medicine physician, and found himself surprised by the relatively scant amount of attention given to cognitive errors. He has gone on to become one of the world's foremost experts in safety in emergency medicine and in diagnostic errors. We spoke to him about both.
Joseph Britto, MD, is CEO and Co-founder of Isabel Healthcare Inc. Isabel, a clinical decision support system, was founded in 1999 by Britto and Jason and Charlotte Maude, whose daughter Isabel was harmed by a medical error. The company has been profiled in the Wall Street Journal, and the system has undergone several validation studies. We asked Dr. Britto to talk with us about eradicating diagnosis errors through diagnosis decision support systems.
P. Jeffrey Brady, MD, MPH; William B. Munier, MD, MBA; Irim Azam, MPH |
This piece, written by three leaders in AHRQ's research portfolio, covers future avenues for patient safety research and reviews current AHRQ projects.