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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 445 Results
Etheridge JC, Moyal-Smith R, Yong TT, et al. JAMA Surg. 2023;Epub Nov 15.
Surgical safety checklists have been credited with improving perioperative patient outcomes, but numerous studies have shown implementation to be variable across settings and surgical specialties. This study aimed to redesign and reimplement the surgical safety checklist in two academic hospitals. Item completion and fidelity improved after reimplementation and exploratory analysis suggests improved patient outcomes (e.g., serious complications).
O’Leary KJ, Johnson JK, Williams MV, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2023;Epub Oct 31.
Teamwork is an essential component of ensuring high quality, safe healthcare. This article describes findings from the Redesigning SystEms to Improve Teamwork and Quality for Hospitalized Patients (RESET) study, which evaluated the impact of complementary interventions to redesign unit-based care (unit-based physician teams, nurse-physician co-leadership, interprofessional rounds, performance reports, patient engagement) on interprofessional teamwork and patient outcomes. Findings demonstrate improved teamwork climate scores among nurses (but not physicians), but researchers did not identify a significant impact on patient outcomes.

McEvoy MD, Abernathy JH, 3rd. Anesthesiol Clin. 2023;41(4):xvii-xix;693-886.

Organizational, unit, and team culture affect the safety of surgical care. This special issue examines overarching principles, common practices, and practical actions that support safe perioperative processes and settings. Topics discussed include team dynamics, operating room design, and high reliability.
Moyal-Smith R, Etheridge JC, Turley N, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2023;Epub Sep 21.
Implementation challenges can hinder the effectiveness of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC). This study describes the validation of the Checklist Performance Observation for Improvement (CheckPOINT) tool to assess SSC implementation fidelity. Based on testing in simulated and real-life clinical practice, researchers found that that the tool can reliably assess implementation fidelity and identify opportunities for improvement.
Congenie K, Bartjen L, Gutierrez D, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2023;49:716-723.
Simulations are routinely used to identify latent safety threats. This article describes the classification of 1,318 latent safety threats identified from 232 simulations. Researchers were then able to issue site-specific and organization-wide standardized dashboards and summaries, thus allowing for local and systemwide improvements.
Liberati EG, Martin GP, Lamé G, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2023;Epub Sep 21.
“Safety cases” are used in healthcare and other industries to communicate the safety of a product, system, or service. In this study, researchers use the “safety case” approach to evaluate the safety of the Safer Clinical Systems program, which is designed to improve the safety and reliability of clinical pathways.  

Marsch A, Khodosh R, Porter M, et al. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2023;89(4):641-54; 57-67.

Patient safety in dermatology has received increasing attention over the past ten years. Part 1 of this series provides examples of patient safety concerns in dermatology (e.g., medication errors, teledermatology) and how key patient safety concepts such as safety culture and root cause analysis can be applied in dermatology settings. Part 2 of this series applies three quality improvement frameworks (LEAN, Six Sigma, and IHI-QI) can be used to improve the quality and safety of dermatology practice.
DeCoster MM, Spiller HA, Badeti J, et al. Pediatrics. 2023;152:e2023061942.
Data from the National Poison Data System is useful for describing characteristics and trends of out-of-hospital medication errors. This retrospective study describes trends in therapeutic errors involving attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications as reported to poison control centers in the United States. From 2000 to 2021, errors increased by 300%, with more than half classified as "inadvertently took or was given medication twice." Although no deaths were reported and less than 5% resulted in moderate or major medical outcomes, increased patient and caregiver education and child-resistant medication containers are needed.
Prior A, Vestergaard CH, Vedsted P, et al. BMC Med. 2023;21:305.
System weaknesses (e.g., resource availability, deficiencies in care coordination) threaten patient safety. This population-based cohort study including 4.7 million Danish adults who interacted with primary or hospital care in 2018, found that indicators of care fragmentation (e.g., higher numbers of involved clinicians, more transitions between providers) increased with patient morbidity level. The researchers found that higher levels of care fragmentation were associated with adverse outcomes, including potentially inappropriate prescribing and mortality.
Vickers-Smith R, Justice AC, Becker WC, et al. Am J Psych. 2023;180:426-436.
Racial and ethnic biases can affect diagnosis and negatively impact patient safety. Based on a sample of over 700,000 veterans, this study found that Black and Hispanic individuals consumed similar amounts of alcohol to White individuals but were more likely to be diagnosed with alcohol use disorder (AUD).
Fink DA, Kilday D, Cao Z, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2023;6:e2317641.
Ensuring all pregnant individuals receive safe maternal care is a national health priority. Using a large national database, this study describes trends in delivery-related severe maternal morbidity (SMM) and mortality in the United States. Maternal mortality decreased for all racial, ethnic, and age groups, while SMM increased for all groups, particularly racial and ethnic minoritized groups. Patients with COVID-19 had a significantly increased risk of death. PSNet features a curated library of maternal safety resources.

Smith MJ. Anesthesiology News. June 6, 2023.

The use of office-based anesthesia presents both care improvements and risks for patients and clinical teams. This article summarizes frontline concerns regarding the use of non–operating room anesthesia and highlights improved team communication, forcing functions, feedback systems and measurement as tactics to enhance safety.
Sanfilippo JS, Kettering C, Smith SR. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2023;66:293-297.
Effective apology for medical mistakes is a cornerstone for healing and improvement. This piece discusses the impact sincere and complete apologies may have on legal resolutions of patient harm. They discuss the current presence of apology laws at the state level and the limited role they play in protecting clinicians who err and apologize in a court of law.
Wolf M, Rolf J, Nelson D, et al. Hosp Pharm. 2023;58:309-314.
Medication administration is a complex process and is a common source of preventable patient harm. This retrospective chart review of 145 surgical patients over a two-month period found that 98.6% of cases involved a potential medication error, most frequently due to potential dose omissions and involving vasopressors, opioids, or neuromuscular blockers.
Willis DN, Looper K, Malone RA, et al. Pediatr Qual Saf. 2023;8:e660.
Reducing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) is a patient safety priority. This article describes the development of a quality improvement initiative to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) on one pediatric oncology ward. The initiative included four key interventions – huddles to improve identification of patients at risk for CLABSI, leadership safety rounds, partnership with the vascular access team, and hospital-acquired condition (HAC) rounding cards to prompt discussions on central line functionality. This multimodal approach led to a significant reduction in CLABSI rates between 2020 and 2021, and an increase in CLABSI-free days.
Cifra CL, Custer JW, Smith CM, et al. Crit Care Med. 2023;51:1492-1501.
Diagnostic errors remain a major healthcare concern. This study was a retrospective record review of 882 pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients to identify diagnostic errors using the Revised Safer Dx tool. Diagnostic errors were found in 13 (1.5%) patients, most commonly associated with atypical presentation and diagnostic uncertainty at admission.
Schneider P, Lorenz A, Menegay MC, et al. Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM. 2023;5:100912.
Reducing maternal morbidity and mortality continues to be a patient safety priority in the United States. The article describes the implementation of a quality improvement initiative in Ohio to improve outcomes for patients with a severe hypertensive event during pregnancy or postpartum. Among 29 participating hospitals between July 2020 and September 2021, the researchers identified sustained improvements in timely and appropriate treatment for severe hypertension, timely follow-up appointment after hospital discharge, and patient education about urgent maternal warning signs across both non-Hispanic Black and White pregnant or postpartum people.
Fisher L, Hopcroft LEM, Rodgers S, et al. BMJ Medicine. 2023;2:e000392.
Pharmacists play a critical role in medication safety. This article evaluated the impact of a pharmacist-led information technology intervention (PINCER) among a retrospective cohort of 56.8 million National Health Service (NHS) patients across 6,367 general practices between September 2019 and September 2021. Findings indicate that potentially dangerous prescribing (i.e., prescribing medications to patients without associated blood test monitoring, co-prescribing medications with adverse indications, prescribing medications to patients with certain comorbidities) was largely unaffected by the COVID-19 pandemic.