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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 41 Results
Grailey K, Hussain R, Wylleman E, et al. BMC Nurs. 2023;22:378.
Barcode medication administration (BCMA) technology reduces risk of many types of medication errors (e.g., wrong drug, wrong patient, omission). This qualitative study of nurses in low- and high-BCMA-use hospital wards describes barriers and facilitators to use. Barriers were consistent across use levels, suggesting that team culture and accountability play a crucial role in increasing BCMA use.
Feather C, Appelbaum N, Darzi A, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2023;32:357–368.
Requiring a prescriber to include an indication for a medication can reduce the risk of wrong-patient orders and improve antimicrobial and opioid stewardship. This review identified 21 studies describing interventions to encourage prescribers to include indications for medications. In addition to patient safety benefits, several risks and drawbacks were uncovered, such as potential loss of patient privacy or alert fatigue.
Kelly D, Koay A, Mineva G, et al. Public Health. 2022;214:50-60.
Natural disasters and other public health emergencies (PHE), such as the COVID-19 pandemic, can dramatically change the delivery of healthcare. This scoping review identified considerable research examining the relationship between public health emergencies and disruptions to personal medication practices (e.g., self-altering medication regimens, access barriers, changing prescribing providers) and subsequent medication-related harm.
Sutherland A, Jones MD, Howlett M, et al. Drug Saf. 2022;45:881-889.
Intravenous (IV) medication smart pumps can improve medication administration, but usability issues can compromise safety. This article outlines strategic recommendations regarding the implementation of smart pump technology to improve patient safety. Recommendations include standardization of infusion concentrations, improving drug libraries using a human-centered approach, and increasing stakeholder engagement.
Sutherland A, Gerrard WS, Patel A, et al. BMJ Open Qual. 2022;11:e001708.
Smart pump software can improve medication safety but can also introduce patient safety hazards, such as alert fatigue. In this study, dose error reduction software (DERS) was implemented across two large UK National Health Service (NHS) institutes for one year. Findings indicate that compliance with DERS was 45%, but across one year of implementation, severe harm or death was avoided in up to 110 patients.
Jones MD, Clarke J, Feather C, et al. Ann Pharmacother. 2021;55:1333-1340.
Medication errors during pediatric resuscitation are common. Using video recordings of simulated pediatric resuscitations, the researchers explored deviations in care related to the delivery of intravenous medicine. Findings suggest that deviations play a crucial role in intravenous medication administration errors, and deviations were more likely to occur during the use of an online injectable medicine guideline.
Härkänen M, Paananen J, Murrells T, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2019;19:791.
This retrospective study used text mining to analyze the free text descriptions in 72,390 medication administration incident reports in the National Reporting and Learning System in England and Wales to identify terms most frequently associated with risk that might otherwise remain buried within other non-relevant text. The authors identified the most common medications described in free text (insulin, antibiotics, paracetamol and morphine) and presented the most common free text terms associated with these medications. Results indicate that checking patient allergies and medication doses, especially for intravenous and transdermal medications, should be a focus of efforts to increase medication administration safety.
Garfield S, Furniss D, Husson F, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2020;29:764-773.
This mixed-methods study of patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals explores how patient-held medication lists (such as paper medication lists, medication diaries, or apps) can support patient safety. Patient-held lists can improve medication safety by improving the accuracy of medication reconciliation, identifying potential drug interactions, and facilitating communication.
Appelbaum N, Clarke J, Feather C, et al. BMJ Open. 2019;9:e032686.
While medication errors during paediatric resuscitation are considered common, little information about the processes that contribute to them has been gathered. This prospective observational study in a large English teaching hospital describes the incidence, nature and severity of medication errors made by 15 teams, each comprised of two doctors and two nurses, during simulated paediatric resuscitations. Clinically significant errors were made in 11 of the 15 cases, most due to discrepancies in drug ordering, preparation and administration. The authors recommend additional research into new approaches to protecting patients in paediatric emergency settings.
Alghamdi AA, Keers RN, Sutherland A, et al. Drug Saf. 2019;42:1423-1436.
The prevalence and nature of medication errors and preventable adverse drug events in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units were examined in this systematic review. In the 35 quantitative studies included in the review, prescribing and medication administration errors were the most common errors reported, with dosing errors the most frequent subtype, in both types of critical care units. The authors concluded that critically ill children admitted to intensive care units frequently experience medication errors and identified important targets to guide remediation efforts.
Blandford A, Dykes PC, Franklin BD, et al. Drug Saf. 2019;42:1157-1165.
Intravenous medication infusions are an important target for safety interventions. Many infused medications, such as opioids and chemotherapy, require vigilant adherence to protocol to prevent harm. Technical solutions to infusion errors such as computerized provider order entry, barcode medication administration, and smart infusion pumps have been implemented with some success. Investigators compared infusion errors in the United States, where all three technical interventions are common, to the United Kingdom, where those technical interventions are rare. Minor errors were common in each country, but only 0.8% of infusions placed patients at serious risk of harm. Although the details of errors in both countries differed in detail, rates of error and harm were similar. A WebM&M commentary described a chemotherapy infusion error that caused renal failure.
Sutherland A, Ashcroft DM, Phipps D. Arch Dis Child. 2019;104:588-595.
Using clinical vignettes, investigators conducted semi-structured interviews with those prescribing medications in a pediatric intensive care unit to better understand human factors contributing to prescribing errors. They found that cognitive load was the main contributor to such errors.
Puaar SJ, Franklin BD. BMJ Qual Saf. 2018;27:529-538.
Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) has vastly improved medication safety when compared to handwritten orders. However, even with CPOE, medication ordering errors are common. This qualitative study used a human factors approach to characterize electronic prescribing errors, which were primarily due to CPOE system design, organizational implementation decisions, and individual prescribing behaviors. A PSNet perspective assessed lessons learned about electronic health record safety.