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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 13 of 13 Results
Halligan D, Janes G, Conner M, et al. J Patient Saf. 2023;19:143-150.
Reducing low-value tests and treatments has been a focus of patient safety efforts, but less attention has been focused on low-value patient safety practices (PSP). This study describes the concept of “safety clutter” and understanding which PSP are of low-value, ineffective, and could be discontinued. Frequently cited PSP included paperwork, duplication, and intentional rounding.
Hacker CE, Debono D, Travaglia J, et al. J Health Organ Manag. 2022;36:981-986.
Disinfection and cleaning of the hospital environment can promote a reduction in healthcare-associated infections. This commentary discussed the important, yet largely invisible, role of the hospital cleaning workforce. The authors also describe additional benefits provided by cleaners, such as reducing patient isolation and alerting clinical staff to patient changes.
Mimmo L, Harrison R, Travaglia J, et al. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2022;64:314-322.
Children with intellectual disabilities may experience poor-quality care and be at higher risk for patient safety events. This cross-sectional study including patients admitted to two children’s hospitals in Australia found that children with intellectual disabilities had longer hospital stays and experienced more admissions with at least one clinical incident (e.g., medication incidents, documentation errors) compared to children without intellectual disabilities.
WebM&M Case July 1, 2018
A young adult with a progressive neurological disorder presented to an emergency department from a nursing home with a dislodged GJ tube. As a workaround to maintain patency when the GJ tube was dislodged, nursing home staff had inserted a Foley catheter into the ostomy, inflated the Foley bulb in the stomach, and tied the distal portion of the catheter in a loose knot. When the patient went to interventional radiology for new GJ tube placement, clinicians found no Foley but inserted a new GJ tube.
Mumford V, Greenfield D, Hogden A, et al. BMJ Open. 2014;4:e005284.
This large Australian study sought to examine whether hand hygiene compliance rates may serve as a reliable indicator of hospital accreditation outcomes. The study revealed that hand hygiene rates across 118 acute hospitals in New South Wales improved from 67.7% in late 2010 to over 80% in early 2013. Smaller hospitals had higher compliance than the largest hospitals. The authors expected to identify an association between hand hygiene rates, accreditation outcomes, and infection control scores, but their results did not support this hypothesis. A previous study from Canada found that increasing overall hand hygiene adherence did not result in decreased rates of key hospital-acquired infections, possibly due to a ceiling effect. A recent AHRQ WebM&M perspective reviewed advances in promoting hand hygiene compliance.