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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 189 Results
Moyal-Smith R, Etheridge JC, Turley N, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2023;Epub Sep 21.
Implementation challenges can hinder the effectiveness of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC). This study describes the validation of the Checklist Performance Observation for Improvement (CheckPOINT) tool to assess SSC implementation fidelity. Based on testing in simulated and real-life clinical practice, researchers found that that the tool can reliably assess implementation fidelity and identify opportunities for improvement.
Huth K, Hotz A, Emara N, et al. J Patient Saf. 2023;19:493-500.
The transition from hospital to home is a vulnerable time as patients may have changes in medications or care needs, or difficulties accessing follow up with an outpatient provider. To reduce adverse events (AE), rehospitalizations, and emergency department visits, this hospital developed a structured discharge bundle based on the I-PASS tool used for inpatient handoffs. AE, rehospitalizations, and emergency department visits were all reduced following implementation of the I-PASS bundle.
Samuelson-Kiraly C, Mitchell JI, Kingston D, et al. Healthc Manage Forum. 2023;Epub Aug 30.
The threat of cybersecurity risks to patient safety is receiving increasing attention. This article describes the development of a new standard to support cyber resiliency in Canada’s healthcare system. The guidance addresses key areas of concern (e.g., organizational risk management, technology considerations, contingency planning), provides suggested roles and responsibilities for an organizational cybersecurity team, and emphasizes the importance of cyber incident response planning.
Mauskar S, Ngo T, Haskell H, et al. J Hosp Med. 2023;18:777-786.
Parents of children with medical complexity can offer unique perspectives on hospital quality and safety. Prior to their child's discharge, parents were surveyed about their child's care, medications, safety, and other concerns experienced during their stay. Parents reported experiencing miscommunication with the providers and providers seemingly not communicating with each other. They also reported inconsistency in care/care plans, unmet expectations, lack of transparency, and a desire for their expertise to be taken seriously.
Willis DN, Looper K, Malone RA, et al. Pediatr Qual Saf. 2023;8:e660.
Reducing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) is a patient safety priority. This article describes the development of a quality improvement initiative to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) on one pediatric oncology ward. The initiative included four key interventions – huddles to improve identification of patients at risk for CLABSI, leadership safety rounds, partnership with the vascular access team, and hospital-acquired condition (HAC) rounding cards to prompt discussions on central line functionality. This multimodal approach led to a significant reduction in CLABSI rates between 2020 and 2021, and an increase in CLABSI-free days.
Nasri B-N, Mitchell JD, Jackson C, et al. Surg Endosc. 2023;37:2316-2325.
Distractions in the operating room can contribute to errors. Based on survey responses from 160 healthcare workers, this study examined perceived distractions in the operating room. All participants ranked auditory distractions as the most distracting and visual distractions as the least distracting, but the top five distractors fell into the equipment and environmental categories – (excessive heat/cold, team member unavailability, poor ergonomics, equipment unavailability, and competitive demand for equipment). Phone calls/pagers/beepers were also cited as a common distractor. 
Eppler MB, Sayegh AS, Maas M, et al. J Clin Med. 2023;12:1687.
Real-time use of artificial intelligence in the operating room allows surgeons to avoid or immediately address intraoperative adverse events. This review summarizes 13 articles published since 2010 that report on the use of artificial intelligence to predict intraoperative adverse events. Most studies used video and more than half were intended to detect bleeding.
Kuzma N, Khan A, Rickey L, et al. J Hosp Med. 2023;8:316-320.
I-PASS, a structured hand-off tool, can reduce preventable adverse events during transitions of care. Previously published studies have shown that Patient and Family-Centered (PFC) I-PASS rounds reduced preventable and non-preventable adverse events (AE) in hospitalized children. This study presents additional analysis, comparing AE rates in children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) to those without. Results show a reduction in AE in both groups, with no statistically significant differences between the groups, suggesting PFC I-PASS may be generalizable to broader groups of patients without needing modification.
Baldwin CA, Hanrahan K, Edmonds SW, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2023;49:14-25.
Unprofessional and disruptive behavior can erode patient safety and safety culture. The Co-Worker Observation System (CORS), a peer-to-peer feedback program previously used with physicians and advance practice providers, was implemented for use with nurses in three hospitals. Reports of unprofessional behavior submitted to the internal reporting system were evaluated by the CORS team, and peer-to-peer feedback was given to the recipient. This pilot study demonstrated that the implementation bundle can be successful with nursing staff.
Stenquist DS, Yeung CM, Szapary HJ, et al. J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev. 2022;6:e22.00079.
The I-PASS structured handoff tool has been widely implemented to improve communication during handoffs and patient transfers. In this study, researchers modified the I-PASS tool for use in orthopedic surgery and assessed the impact on adverse clinical outcomes. After 18 months, there was sustained adherence to the tool and the quality of handoffs improved, but no notable changes in clinical outcomes were identified.
McKay C, Schenkat D, Murphy K, et al. Hosp Pharm. 2022;57:689-696.
Insulin is a high-alert medication due to heightened risk for serious patient harm if administered incorrectly. This review presents types of common errors (e.g., wrong patient, cross-contamination), pros and cons of potential dispensing strategies, and the impact of organizational factors (e.g., workflows, cost) on safe dispensing. Additionally, the authors make recommendations for dispensing, taking organization factors into account.
Mercer AN, Mauskar S, Baird JD, et al. Pediatrics. 2022;150:e2021055098.
Children with serious medical conditions are vulnerable to medical errors. This prospective study examined safety reporting behaviors among parents of children with medical complexity and hospital staff caring for these patients in one tertiary children’s hospital. Findings indicate that parents frequently identify medical errors or quality issues, despite not being routinely advised on how to report safety concerns.
Weiseth A, Plough A, Aggarwal R, et al. Birth. 2022;49:637-647.
Labor and delivery is a high-risk care environment. This study evaluated a quality improvement initiative (TeamBirth) designed to promote shared decision-making and safety culture in labor and delivery. This mixed-methods study included both clinicians and patients at four hospitals and found that the program was feasible, increased the use of huddles, and had no negative effects on patient safety.
Moore MR, Mitchell SJ, Weller JM, et al. Anaesthesia. 2021;77:185-195.
Surgical safety checklists (SSCs) have been shown to improve patient outcomes and reduce complications. In this study, postoperative mortality and increased days alive and out of hospital were measures for surgical patients in the 18-month period prior to implementation of the SSC and the 18-month period following implementation. Changes in mortality and days alive and out of hospital during these time periods were indistinguishable from longer-term trends. Researchers noted Māori patients had worse outcomes than non-Māori patients.
Vo J, Gillman A, Mitchell K, et al. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2021;25:17-24.
Racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare can affect patient safety and contribute to adverse health outcomes. This review outlines the impact of health disparities and treatment decision-making biases (implicit bias, default bias, delay discounting, and availability bias) on cancer-related adverse effects among Black cancer survivors. The authors identify several ways that nurses may help mitigate health disparity-related adverse treatment effects, such as providing culturally appropriate care; assessing patient health literacy and comprehension; educating, empowering, and advocating for patients; and adhering to evidence-based guidelines for monitoring and management of treatment-related adverse events. The authors also discuss the importance of ongoing training on the impact of structural racism, ways to mitigate its effects, and the role of research and implementation to reduce implicit bias.