Skip to main content

The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

Search All Content

Search Tips
Selection
Format
Download
Filter By Author(s)
Advanced Filtering Mode
Date Ranges
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Additional Filters
Selection
Format
Download
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6 Results
Awad S, Amon K, Baillie A, et al. Int J Med Inform. 2023;172:105017.
Computerized provider order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support (CDS), and electronic medication management systems (EMMS) have increased efficiency and reduced prescribing errors, but poor design may introduce new safety hazards. Human factors and safety analysis methods can be used to increase the safety of new technologies, ideally before problems arise. This review identifies human factors and safety analysis methods applied to EMMS. Most methods focused on usability or design, and only one used a safety-oriented approach. Increased inclusion of human factors specialists could increase the use of safety-oriented methods of EMMS design.
Zheng WY, Lichtner V, Van Dort BA, et al. Res Soc Admin Pharm. 2021;17:832-841.
This systematic review sought to determine the impact of automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs), barcode medication administration (BCMA), and closed-loop electronic medication management systems (EMMS) used by hospitals in reducing controlled substance medication errors in hospitals. Overall, only 4 studies (out of 16) focused directly on controlled medications. A variety of types of errors (e.g., log-in, data, entry, override) compromised patient safety. High-quality targeted research is urgently needed to evaluate the risks and benefits of medication-related technology.
Tariq A, Georgiou A, Raban MZ, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2016;25:704-15.
This qualitative study of medication prescribing practices at long-term care facilities uncovered multiple safety hazards, including inadequate handoffs, insufficient information flow, and lack of a robust safety culture. The results suggest that both systems approaches and team training are needed to improve medication safety in long-term care facilities.
Taib IA, McIntosh AS, Caponecchia C, et al. Saf Sci. 2011;49.
This review compared 26 medical error taxonomies using a human factors perspective and demonstrated that each taxonomy provides different information. The authors highlight the importance of taxonomies that use knowledge of cognitive mechanisms and theoretical error concepts to classify causal mechanisms of errors.