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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 106 Results
Auerbach AD, Astik GJ, O’Leary KJ, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2023;38:1902-1910.
COVID-19 ushered in new diagnostic challenges and changes in care practices. In this study conducted during the first wave of the pandemic, charts for hospitalized adult patients under investigation (PUI) for COVID-19 were reviewed for potential diagnostic error. Diagnostic errors were identified in 14% of cases; patients with and without diagnostic errors were statistically similar and errors were not associated with pandemic-related change practices.
Auerbach AD, O'Leary KJ, Greysen SR, et al. J Hosp Med. 2020;15:483-488.
Based on a survey of hospital medicine groups at academic medical centers in the United States (conducted April 2020), the authors of this study characterized inpatient adaptations to care for non-ICU COVID-19 patients. Sites reported rapid expansion of respiratory isolation units (RIUs – dedicated units for patients with known or suspected COVID-19), an emphasis on telemedicine for patient evaluation, and implementation of approaches to minimize room entry. In addition, nearly half of responding sites reported diagnostic errors involving COVID-19 (missing non-COVID-19 diagnoses among infected patients and missing COVID-19 diagnoses in patients admitted for other reasons).
Stolldorf DP, Mixon AS, Auerbach AD, et al. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2020;77:1135-1143.
This mixed-methods study assessed the barriers and facilitators to hospitals’ implementation of the MARQUIS toolkit, which supports hospitals in developing medication reconciliation programs. Leadership who responded to the survey/interview expressed limited institutional budgetary and hiring support, but hospitals were able to implement and sustain the toolkit by shifting staff responsibilities, adding pharmacy staff, and using a range of implementation strategies (e.g., educational tools for staff, EHR templates).
Perspective on Safety September 1, 2019
… been with us from the start) and project analysts Tiffany Lee and Vida Lynum (who have both worked on the project for … Medicine University of California, San Francisco … Robert M. Wachter, MD … Professor and Chair, Department of Medicine …
This piece explores the evolution of PSNet and WebM&M since their inception (WebM&M in 2003 and PSNet in 2005) and summarizes changes in the patient safety landscape over time.
Perspective on Safety November 1, 2018
This piece, written by the physician who coined the term "hospitalist," provides an overview of the hospitalist model and reflects on key advantages of and challenges faced by the Comprehensive Care Physician Model.
This piece, written by the physician who coined the term "hospitalist," provides an overview of the hospitalist model and reflects on key advantages of and challenges faced by the Comprehensive Care Physician Model.
Dr. Meltzer is the Fanny L. Pritzker Professor of Medicine, Chief of the Section of Hospital Medicine, and Director of the Center for Health and the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago. His research aims to improve the quality and lower the cost of hospital care. We spoke with him about the Comprehensive Care Physician Model, which he pioneered and was recently featured in an article in The New York Times Magazine.
Wick EC, Sehgal NL. JAMA Surg. 2018;153:948-954.
This systematic review of opioid stewardship practices following surgery identified eight intervention studies intended to reduce postsurgical opioid use. Organizational-level interventions such as changing orders in the electronic health record, demonstrated clear reductions in opioid prescribing. Clinician-facing interventions such as development and dissemination of local guidelines also led to reduced opioid prescribing. The authors emphasize the need for more high-quality evidence on opioid stewardship interventions.
Chacko KM, Halvorsen AJ, Swenson SL, et al. Am J Med Qual. 2018;33:405-412.
Engaging trainees in quality improvement efforts has been an important area of focus within graduate medical education, but less is known about how health system resources are aligned with these activities. Researchers used survey data to better understand the perceptions of internal medicine residency program directors regarding health system support for and alignment with graduate medical education quality improvement efforts.
Gandhi TK, Kaplan GS, Leape L, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2018;27:1019-1026.
Over the last decade, the Lucian Leape Institute has explored five key areas in health care to advance patient safety. These include medical education reform, care integration, patient and family engagement, transparency, and joy and meaning in work and workforce safety for health care professionals. This review highlights progress to date in each area and the challenges that remain to be addressed, including increasing clinician burnout and shortcomings of existing health information technology approaches. The authors also suggest opportunities for further research such as measuring the impact of residency training programs. In a past PSNet interview, Dr. Tejal Gandhi, president of the IHI/NPSF Lucian Leape Institute, discussed improving patient safety at a national level.
Wachter R, Howell MD. JAMA. 2018;320:25-26.
The impact of electronic health records has thus far been disappointing for many clinicians, with limited effect on patient safety and growing concern that electronic health records may contribute to physician burnout. This commentary discusses the productivity paradox of information technology—the fact that digitization often initially impedes productivity rather than enhancing it. The authors highlight recent advancements in health care information technology that hold promise to overcome the productivity paradox, such as artificial intelligence, and discuss barriers that must be surmounted in order for health IT to meet its potential.
Auerbach AD, Neinstein A, Khanna R. Ann Intern Med. 2018;168:733-734.
Digital tools have the potential to improve diagnosis, patient self-care, and patient–clinician communication. This commentary argues that digital tools that alter diagnosis or treatment require examination to ensure safety. The authors provide recommendations such as involving experts in evaluating the tools, engaging information technologists, and continuous local review and assessment to identify and address risks associated with use of such tools in practice.
Sarkar U, McDonald KM, Motala A, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2017;43:661-670.
Patient safety in the ambulatory setting is gaining traction as a focus of research and improvement efforts. Discussing the methods and results of an AHRQ Technical Brief, this commentary summarizes expert opinion on the report to propose recommendations for a research strategy on ambulatory patient safety. The authors outline patient safety practices relevant to the ambulatory setting and suggest activities to advance improvement efforts in outpatient care, such as measure development and use of health information technologies.
Perspective on Safety December 1, 2017
… of California, San Francisco … References … 1. Kohn L, Corrigan J, Donaldson M, eds. To Err Is Human: Building a … Chicago Press; 2003. ISBN: 0226066789. 3. ten Cate O, Hart D, Ankel F, et al; International Competency-Based Medical … PubMed] 4. Lyndon A, Sexton JB, Simpson KR, Rosenstein A, Lee KA, Wachter RM. Predictors of likelihood of speaking up …
This piece explores progress of patient safety in the surgical field and where further improvement can be made, such as ongoing assessment of procedural skills along with video recording and review of surgical procedures.
Dr. Bilimoria is the Director of the Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center of Northwestern University, which focuses on national, regional, and local quality improvement research and practical initiatives. He is also the Director of the Illinois Surgical Quality Improvement Collaborative and a Faculty Scholar at the American College of Surgeons. In the second part of a two-part interview (the earlier one concerned residency duty hours), we spoke with him about quality and safety in surgery.
Burke RE, Schnipper JL, Williams M, et al. Med Care. 2017;55:285-290.
This retrospective cohort study demonstrated that a readmission risk score could prospectively identify patients at risk for readmissions for the four target conditions for nonpayment: acute myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and heart failure. These results suggest that this algorithm can identify a high-risk patient group who may benefit from interventions to prevent readmission.
Myers JS, Tess A, McKinney K, et al. J Grad Med Educ. 2017;9:9-13.
It is critical to educate trainees about patient safety. In this study, researchers described lessons learned from creating a leadership role that bridges quality and safety activities with graduate medical education in each of their institutions. Key responsibilities included clinical oversight, faculty development, and educational innovation. The authors advocate for further evaluation of this safety and education leadership role to determine its impact on medical education and patient outcomes.
Greysen R, Harrison JD, Kripalani S, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017;26:33-41.
Hospitals with high readmission rates face reductions in Medicare reimbursements. Understanding the patient perspective at the time of readmission may better inform future readmission reduction efforts. Researchers surveyed patients readmitted to the general medicine services within 30 days of discharge across 12 hospitals on multiple aspects of self-care. Although 91% of patients reported understanding of their discharge plan, more than 52% reported difficulty with at least one aspect of self-care after discharge.
Gupta R, Moriates C, Harrison JD, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017;26:475-483.
Health care institutions are increasingly focused on providing high-value care and preventing overuse. In this study, researchers developed a validated High-Value Care Culture Survey and found that administering the survey at two large academic medical centers provided health care leaders with an opportunity to target their improvement efforts.
Pannick S, Wachter R, Vincent CA, et al. BMJ. 2016;355:i5417.
Patient safety research and commentary often focus on specialized care processes rather than medical wards. Exploring challenges to improving safety in the medical ward environment, this commentary outlines four strategies to address complexity of implementing initiatives in this setting.
Rosenbluth G, Jacolbia R, Milev D, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2016;25:324-8.
Despite advances in handoff practices, printed signout documents remain ubiquitous in inpatient settings. This chart review study found that the accuracy of printed signout sheets decline significantly over the course of a physician shift. This work highlights the need for more real-time updated patient information than a printed page can provide.
Auerbach AD, Kripalani S, Vasilevskis EE, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176:484-93.
Preventing readmissions is a cornerstone of patient safety efforts. However, one concern about nonpayment for readmissions is that many may not be preventable. To determine whether they were preventable, this observational study investigated readmissions through patient and physician surveys along with chart review. Researchers determined that only one quarter of readmissions were preventable. Factors associated with potential preventability were premature hospital discharge, insufficient communication with outpatient providers, failure to discuss care goals, and emergency department decisions to readmit a patient who did not require a second inpatient stay. These results suggest that multiple interventions will be needed to avert readmissions, and such efforts will have limited impact since most readmissions are not preventable.
Gupta K, Wachter R, Kachalia A. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017;26:164-168.
Although financial incentives have been widely adopted, they may not lead to organizational improvements. This commentary raises concerns about including hospital mortality in incentive programs, since patient deaths do not necessarily mean poor quality care. The authors suggest that further research is needed to enhance accuracy of risk-adjusted mortality and to account for differences in patient treatment preferences.