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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9 Results
McCurdie T, Sanderson P, Aitken LM, et al. Appl Ergon. 2017;58:102-109.
Interruptions are common in care settings and can introduce safety hazards into health care processes. This commentary describes an observational method to explore factors that contribute to interruptions from various perspectives to better understand the reasons for interruptions and design strategies to manage them. A past PSNet perspective discussed an approach to reduce interruptions.
McCurdie T, Sanderson P, Aitken LM. Int J Nurs Stud. 2017;66:23-36.
Interruptions are prevalent in health care delivery settings. This review discusses epidemiology, quality improvement, cognitive systems engineering, and applied cognitive psychology as prominent research traditions examining interruptions in health care. The authors suggest that a more integrated approach that combines perspectives from these research traditions could enhance design of interventions to reduce interruptions.
Grundgeiger T, Dekker SWA, Sanderson P, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2016;25:392-5.
Interruptions are a common occurrence in health care. This commentary suggests that research about interruptions clearly determine definitions, data collection methods, and processes that are affected to enhance understanding regarding the impact of disruptions on patient safety.
Massey D, Aitken LM, Chaboyer W. Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2015;31:83-90.
This study of an after-hours rapid response team found that the team was not always activated as intended. More unplanned admissions to intensive care were identified following rapid response implementation, possibly due to enhanced surveillance for clinical deterioration. Under-utilization of rapid response may account for mixed results in improving patient safety.
Prakash V, Koczmara C, Savage P, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2014;23:884-92.
This study used high-fidelity simulation to evaluate the impact of several interventions on preventing medication administration errors by chemotherapy nurses. Interventions with a basis in human factors engineering principles appeared to be highly effective at reducing errors related to interruptions.