Skip to main content

The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

Search All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Additional Filters
Displaying 1 - 20 of 779 Results
Aubin DL, Soprovich A, Diaz Carvallo F, et al. BMJ Open Qual. 2022;11:e002004.
Healthcare workers (HCW) and patients can experience negative psychological impacts following medical error; the negative impact can be compounded when workers and patients are prevented from processing the error. This study explored interactions between patients/families and HCWs following a medical error, highlighting barriers to communication, as well as the need for training and peer support for HCWs. Importantly, HCW and patients/families expressed feeling empathy towards the other and stressed that open communication can lead to healing for some.
Skead C, Thompson LH, Kuk H, et al. Crit Care Res Pract. 2022;2022:4815734.
After-hours and weekend admissions to the hospital and intensive care units (ICU) have been linked to poor outcomes. This retrospective analysis compared outcomes among adult patients with daytime versus nighttime ICU admissions at one large Canadian medical center in between 2011 and 2015. Researchers found that overall mortality, but not ICU mortality, was higher among daytime admissions.
Klasen JM, Teunissen PW, Driessen E, et al. Med Educ. 2022;Epub Nov 4.
Learning to recover after a medical error is an important component of medical training. This qualitative study, which included postgraduate trainees from Europe and Canada, concluded that failure represents a valuable learning opportunity, but noted the importance of perceived intentions if trainees judge that their supervisors have allowed them to fail.
Rose SC, Ashari NA, Davies JM, et al. CJEM. 2022;24:695-701.
Debriefing is used to enhance individual and team communication and to facilitate real-time learning opportunities after a critical event. This study evaluated a charge nurse-facilitated clinical debriefing program used in Emergency Departments (EDs) in Alberta, Canada. Qualitative analyses identified several themes underscoring the impact of the debriefing program – the impacts on clinical practice and patient care, impacts on psychological safety and teamwork, stress management, and the emotional acknowledgement after critical events – and barriers to debriefing.

Healthcare Excellence Canada. 2022.

After a patient safety incident, effective discussions are critical for healing and improvement. This website houses collections of materials to support constructive communication should a failure or near-miss occur. There are two distinct sections of materials: one for established healthcare professionals, and another for patients, students, and caregivers.
M. Violato E. Can J Respir Ther. 2022;58:137-142.
Healthcare trainees and junior clinicians are often reluctant to speak up about safety concerns. This qualitative study found that simulation training to enhance speaking up behaviors had lasting effects among advanced care paramedics and respiratory therapists as they moved from training into practice. Respondents highlighted the importance of experience for speaking up and the benefits of high-impact simulation training.
Wilson M-A, Sinno M, Hacker Teper M, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:680-685.
Achieving zero preventable harm is an ongoing goal for health systems. In this study, researchers developed a five-part strategy to achieve high-reliability and eliminate preventable harm at one regional health system in Canada – (1) engage leadership, (2) develop an organization-specific patient safety framework, (3) monitor specific quality aims (e.g., high-risk, high-cost areas), (4) standardize the incident review process, including the use of root cause analysis, and (5) communicate progress to staff in real-time via electronic dashboards. One-year post-implementation, researchers observed an increase in patient safety incident reporting and improvements in safety culture, as well as decreases in adverse events such as falls, pressure injuries and healthcare-acquired infections.
Sibbald M, Abdulla B, Keuhl A, et al. JMIR Hum Factors. 2022;9:e39234.
Electronic differential diagnostic support (EDS) are decision aids that suggest one or more differential diagnoses based on clinical data entered by the clinician. The generated list may prompt the clinician to consider additional diagnoses. This study simulated the use of one EDS, Isabel, in the emergency department to identify barriers and supports to its effectiveness. Four themes emerged. Notably, some physicians thought the EDS-generated differentials could reduce bias while others suggested it could introduce bias.
Kam AJ, Gonsalves CL, Nordlund SV, et al. BMC Emerg Med. 2022;22:152.
Debriefing after significant clinical events facilitates team-based communication, learning, and support. This study compared two post-resuscitation debriefing tools (Debriefing In Situ Conversation after Emergent Resuscitation Now [DISCERN] and Post-Code Pause [PCP]) following any intubation, resuscitation, or serious/unanticipated patient outcome in a children’s hospital. PCP was found to provide more emotional support and clinical learning, but there were no differences in the remaining categories.
Volpini ME, Lekx‐Toniolo K, Mahon R, et al. J Appl Clin Med Phys. 2022;23:e13742.
The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically impacted the way that health care teams function. This study examined how COVID-19-related workflow changes affected reporting of medical errors and near misses occurring in one hospital’s radiation oncology program. After the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was fewer incidents reported overall, but an increase in submissions related to poor documentation and communication.
Dehmoobad Sharifabadi A, Clarkin C, Doja A. BMJ Open. 2022;12:e063104.
Several countries have resident duty hour (RDH) restrictions and there are numerous publications examining the impact of RDH on patient safety. This study used two online discussion forums (one primarily in the United States and the other in Canada) to assess resident perceptions of RDH. Themes included its impact on residents’ education and clinician well-being, and, worryingly, discussions of not reporting RDH violations.
Curated Libraries
October 10, 2022
Selected PSNet materials for a general safety audience focusing on improvements in the diagnostic process and the strategies that support them to prevent diagnostic errors from harming patients.
Redelmeier DA, Shafir E. Med Decis Making. 2022;Epub Sep 5.
Premature closure occurs when clinicians accept a diagnosis before it has been confirmed and alternative diagnoses have been explored and can lead to missed diagnosis. In this study, participants (including both health care professionals and community members) were provided one of five scenarios describing a hypothetical patient with symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 in the presence or absence alternative diagnosis (e.g., COVID-19 symptoms and the presence or absence of a positive flu test). Findings suggest that bias can lead individual to overlook the likelihood of COVID-19 when an alternative diagnosis is present.
Lim Fat GJ, Gopaul A, Pananos AD, et al. Geriatrics (Basel). 2022;7:81.
The risk of adverse events increases with prolonged hospital stays. This descriptive study examined adverse events among older patients with extended hospital admissions pending transfer to long-term care (LTC) settings at two Canadian hospitals. Analyses showed that patients were designated as “alternate level of care” (ALC) for an average of 56 days before transfer to LTC and adverse events such as falls and urinary tract infections were common.
van Dalen ASHM, Jung JJ, Nieveen van Dijkum EJM, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:617-623.
Leveraging lessons learned in aviation, patient safety researchers have begun exploring the use of medical data recorders (i.e., “black boxes”) to identify errors and threats to patient safety. This cross-sectional study found that a medical data recorder identified an average of 53 safety threats or resilience support events among 35 standard laparoscopic procedures. These events primarily involved communication failures, poor teamwork, and situational awareness failures.

Jefs L, Kuluski K, MacLaurin A, et al. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Healthcare Excellence Canada; 2022.

Patient engagement in safety improvement goes beyond activities related to direct care. This report highlights the value that patient perspectives bring to the effort to translate the results of a national measures program to strengthen strategic progress and patient and family program involvement.
Packer MDC, Ravinsky E, Azordegan N. Am J Clin Pathol. 2022;157:767-773.
Studies have shown diagnostic discordance in evaluation of surgical pathology specimens. In this study, pathologists and pathology residents were asked to diagnose surgical pathology or cytopathology cases and provide a diagnosis. Most respondents provided the correct diagnosis for most of the cases; 35% of cases were wholly or partially misdiagnosed. Educational and process changes (e.g., requiring subspecialist over-read for some diagnoses) were implemented in the pathology department in response, resulting in substantial improvement in error rates.
Healthcare Excellence Canada.
This site provides promotional materials for an annual awareness campaign on patient safety that takes place in the autumn. The annual observance is held in late October.
Coffey M, Marino M, Lyren A, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2022;176:924-932.
The Partnership for Patients (P4P) program launched hospital engagement networks (HEN) in 2011 to reduce hospital-acquired harms. This study reports on the outcomes of eight conditions from one HEN, Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety (SPS). While the results do show a reduction in harms, the authors state earlier claims of improvement may have been overstated due to failure to not adjust for secular improvements. The co-director of Partnership for Patients, Dr. Paul McGann, was interviewed in 2016 for a PSNet perspective.
Harsini S, Tofighi S, Eibschutz L, et al. Diagnostics (Basel). 2022;12:1761.
Incomplete or delayed communication of imaging results can result in harm to the patient and have legal ramifications for the providers involved. This commentary presents a closed-loop communication model for the ordering clinician and radiologist. The model suggests the ordering clinician categorize the radiology report as “concordant” or “discordant”, and if discordant, provide an explanation.