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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 67 Results
Nilsson L, Lindblad M, Johansson N, et al. Int J Nurs Stud. 2022;138:104434.
Nurse-sensitive outcomes are important indicators of nursing safety. In this retrospective study of 600 patient records from ten Swedish home healthcare organizations, researchers found that 74% of patient safety incidents were classified as nursing-sensitive and that the majority of those events were preventable. The most common types of nursing-sensitive events were falls, pressure injuries, healthcare-associated infections, and incidents related to medication management.
Sterling MR, Lau J, Rajan M, et al. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2022;Epub Dec 5.
Home healthcare is common among older adults, who are often vulnerable to patient safety events due to factors such as medical complexity. This cross-sectional study of 4,296 Medicare patients examined the relationship between receipt of home healthcare services, perceived gaps in care coordination, and preventable adverse outcomes. The researchers found that home healthcare was not associated with self-reported gaps in care coordination, but was associated with increases in self-reported preventable drug-drug interactions (but not ED visits or hospital admissions).
Lipprandt M, Liedtke W, Langanke M, et al. BMC Nurs. 2022;21:264.
Hospital-level care at home can reduce cost and hospital readmissions, but adverse events still occur at levels similar to hospitals. This study explored adverse events related to home mechanical ventilation (HMV), in order to categorize causes and recommend solutions. Interventions for nurses (e.g., checklists) and manufacturers (e.g., alarm design) may improve HMV.
Dumitrescu I, Casteels M, De Vliegher K, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:435-443.
Medication errors and other adverse events are thought to occur in 10% of home care patients. This Delphi study identified 27 high-risk medications (e.g., oral chemotherapy, anticoagulants) in home care nursing that require a specific procedure and an additional 28 that warrant additional monitoring. Home care agencies and researchers should focus on developing and evaluating policies to improve safety of high-risk medications.
Soto C, Dixon-Woods M, Tarrant C. Arch Dis Child. 2022;107:1038-1042.
Children with complex medical needs are vulnerable to patient safety threats. This qualitative study explored the perspectives of parents with children living at home with a central venous access device (CVAD). Parents highlight the persistent fear of central line-associated blood stream infections as well as the importance of maintaining a sense of normalcy for their children.
Buitrago I, Seidl KL, Gingold DB, et al. J Healthc Qual. 2022;44:169-177.
Reducing hospital 30-day readmissions is seen as a way to improve safety and reduce costs. Baltimore City mobile integrated health and community paramedicine (MIH-CP) was designed to improve transitional care from hospital to home. After one year in operation, MIH-CP performed a chart review to determine causes of readmission among patients in the program. Root cause analysis indicated that at least one social determinant of health (e.g., health literacy) played a role in preventable readmissions; the program was modified to improve transitional care.
Strube‐Lahmann S, Müller‐Werdan U, Klingelhöfer‐Noe J, et al. Pharmacol Res Perspect. 2022;10:e00953.
Patients receiving home care services are vulnerable to medication errors. Based on survey feedback from 485 home care nurses in Germany, this study found that regular medication training and use of quality assurance principles (i.e., double checking) can decrease the incidence of medication errors in home care settings.
Patient Safety Primer April 27, 2022

Post-acute transitions – which involve patients being discharged from the hospital to home-based or community care environments – are associated with patient safety risks, often due to poor communication and fragmented care. This primer outlines the main types of home-based care services and formal home-based care programs and how these services can increase patient safety and improve health outcomes.

Dionisi S, Di Simone E, Liquori G, et al. Public Health Nurs. 2022;39:876-897.
Causes of medication errors occurring in home care may differ from those in the hospital setting. This systematic review identified three main risk factors for medication errors in the home: transition documentation, medication reconciliation, and communication among the multidisciplinary team. Most studies recommend involvement of a pharmacist as a member of the care team.
Silverglow A, Johansson L, Lidén E, et al. Scand J Caring Sci. 2022;36:852-862.
Home care settings harbor unique patient safety challenges. This qualitative study identified three themes regarding care providers’ perceptions of providing safe care for frail older adults living at home – the role of the encounter and interaction, the responsibility of the caregiver, and the threat of insufficient organizational resources.
Aasen L, Johannessen A‐K, Ruud Knutsen I, et al. J Clin Nurs. 2022;31:2495-2506.
Patients receiving hospital-level care at home (hospital-at-home, (HAH) have fewer complications, better patient and family satisfaction, and better outcomes. This study describes nurses’ and physicians’ perspectives of pediatric HAH. Three themes evolved: building a trusting relationship with the child and family; performing essential skills; and acting as the “hub” between families and providers.

Taylor K. American Nurse J. 2021;16(7):14-17.

Medication reconciliation reduces the potential for problems in complicated medication regimens. This article shares strategies for reconciling medications for older patients in the home to ensure their medication use is safe and appropriate.
Sharp R, Turner L, Altschwager J, et al. J Clin Nurs. 2021;30:1751-1759.
Safety in home health care delivery is receiving increasing attention. This retrospective cohort study found that patients with medically stable, chronic conditions undergoing blood transfusion in a home setting provided by a nurse-led service experienced low rates of adverse events.
Macías-Colorado ME, Rodríguez-Pérez M, Rojas-Ocaña MJ, et al. Healthcare (Basel). 2021;9:205.
Clear communication between patients, family caregivers, and nurses is crucial to improve patient safety in the home. This qualitative study identified four key concepts around communication of safe family caregiving: communication-related aspects, professional skills of nurse case managers, communication on safety, and the caregiving role. The authors suggest five areas for research to improve patient safety in the home.   
Patient Safety Innovation April 7, 2021

The Hospital at Homesm program provides hospital-level care (including daily physician and nurse visits, diagnostic testing, treatment, and other support) in a patient's home as a full substitute for acute hospital care for selected conditions that are common among seniors. Studies have shown that the Hospital at Home program results in lower length of stay, costs, readmission rates, and complications than does traditional inpatient care, and surveys indicate higher levels of patient and family member satisfaction than with traditional care.

Patient Safety Innovation March 31, 2021

Care management staff (such as nurses, community health workers, health coaches, social workers, or other clinical staff) use software-based protocols to screen older clients' medications and collaborate with pharmacists and physicians to reduce the risk of medication errors and adverse effects. The HomeMeds Medication Safety Program identified and addressed targeted medication problems, leading to fewer cases of therapeutic duplication and more appropriate medication use for cardiovascular medications, NSAIDS, psychotropics and overall medication use.

ten Haken I, Ben Allouch S, van Harten WH. Nurse Educ Today. 2021;100:104813.
Adverse events are common among patients receiving home care, particularly among those requiring complex medication dosing or use of infusion devices. Results from a survey administered to home care nurses in the Netherlands reveal that nurses may not receive practical training or be tested in required skills for the use of advanced medical technologies, such as infusion therapy, parenteral nutrition, or morphine pumps.
Jachan DE, Müller‐Werdan U, Lahmann NA. Nurs Open. 2021;8:755-765.
This survey of home care nurses in Germany identified several factors they perceived as contributing to medical errors, including workload and knowledge gaps. Findings indicate that regular error management trainings can improve hygiene and medication administration.
Pogorzelska-Maziarz M, Chastain AM, Mangal S, et al. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2020;21:1782-1790.e4.
The COVID-19 pandemic has raised concerns about home healthcare, which is common among older and disabled patients managing chronic conditions. This qualitative study explored perceived successes and challenges with regards to infection prevention and control among home healthcare staff. Identified challenges included the unpredictability of the home environment, patient/family dynamics, the intermittent nature of home healthcare, and staffing issues. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, home health leadership should consider these challenges as they prioritize infection prevention and control.
Pestian T, Thienprayoon R, Grossoehme D, et al. Pediatr Qual Saf. 2020;5:e328.
The authors used qualitative data to evaluate parental perspectives of quality in pediatric home-based hospice and palliative care (HBHPC) programs, and how parents define “safe care” in the home. Thematic analysis identified eight domains of safety prioritized by patients, including an emphasis on the safety of the physical environment, medication safety, maintaining comfort and preventing harm, and trust in the HBHPC caregivers.