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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 709 Results
Kelly D, Koay A, Mineva G, et al. Public Health. 2022;214:50-60.
Natural disasters and other public health emergencies (PHE), such as the COVID-19 pandemic, can dramatically change the delivery of healthcare. This scoping review identified considerable research examining the relationship between public health emergencies and disruptions to personal medication practices (e.g., self-altering medication regimens, access barriers, changing prescribing providers) and subsequent medication-related harm.
Agarwal AK, Sagan C, Gonzales R, et al. J Am Coll Emerg Physicians Open. 2022;3:e12870.
Black patients who report experiencing racism in healthcare report poorer quality of care. In this text-message based study, Black and White patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) were asked about their overall quality of care and whether they perceived an impact of their race on their care. While Black patients reported high overall quality of care, 10% believed their race negatively impacted their care. The authors highlight the importance of asking about the impact of race on care to identify and reduce potential disparities.
Gleeson LL, Clyne B, Barlow JW, et al. Int J Pharm Pract. 2023;Epub Jan 3.
Remote delivery of care, such as telehealth and e-prescribing, increased sharply at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. This rapid review was conducted to determine the types and frequency of medication safety incidents associated with remote delivery of primary care prior to the pandemic. Fifteen articles were identified covering medication safety and e-prescribing; none of these studies associated medication safety and telehealth.

Abelson R. New York Times. December 15, 2022.

Emergency department safety is challenged by factors such as production pressure, burnout, and overcrowding. This news article provides context for the 2022 AHRQ report Diagnostic Errors in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review from the Johns Hopkins Medicine Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) which synthesized the number of patients harmed while seeking emergency care.

Ramachandran V. Kaiser Health News. January 6, 2023.

Inadequate equipment and personnel training degrade the reliability of individuals to provide safe care in an emergency. This article discusses inconsistent preparedness throughout commercial aviation to support care during an in-flight medical situation; it suggests federal oversight of medical kits may help to ensure their completeness and improve the potential for safety should care be required.
Armstrong-Mensah E, Rasheed N, Williams D, et al. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2022;Epub Nov 4.
Black patients who experience racism from their providers report receiving lower quality of care. Black public health students were asked about racist behaviors exhibited by their healthcare providers and the impacts the behaviors had on their care. The students recommend education and accountability to reduce providers’ racist attitudes, as well as increasing the number of Black clinicians.  

Cambridge, MA: Institute for Healthcare Improvement: January 2023.

The National Steering Committee for Patient Safety (NSC) was formed to engage with the health care community to plan and prioritize patient safety work to generate improvements. This short survey seeks comments from the field to determine current interest and status in efforts aligned with the National Action Plan to Advance Patient Safety.

Newman-Toker DE, Peterson SM, Badihian S, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; December 2022. AHRQ Publication No. 22(23)-EHC043.

Although diagnostic accuracy in the emergency department (ED) is high, diagnostic errors still occur. This evidence review estimated that 1 in 18 ED patients receive an incorrect diagnosis, which translates to 7.4 million patients misdiagnosed every year (or 5.7% of all ED visits annually). Five conditions were found to be most vulnerable to misdiagnosis: stroke, heart attack, aortic aneurysm/ dissection, spinal cord injury and blood clots. The evidence review identified variation in diagnostic error rates across demographic groups; female sex and non-White race were often associated with increased risk for diagnostic errors. Serious misdiagnosis-related harms were often associated with clinician bedside judgement and other cognitive failures. 
Gotlieb R, Praska C, Hendrickson MA, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5:e2242972.
Ensuring patients understand their diagnosis and care plan is important to achieving optimal outcomes. However, patients routinely report not understanding what their provider has told them. In this study, adults were asked for their understanding of jargon clinicians regularly use (“negative” test results, NPO) and a corresponding statement without jargon (“you do not have an infection”, “nothing by mouth”). Some jargon was better understood (“negative”) than other jargon (“occult infection”). Participant demographics were not significantly associated with understanding jargon.
Hailu EM, Maddali SR, Snowden JM, et al. Health Place. 2022;78:102923.
Racial and ethnic health disparities are receiving increased attention, and yet structural racism continues to negatively impact communities of color. This review identified only six papers studying the impact of structural racism on severe maternal morbidity (SMM). Despite heterogeneity in measures and outcomes, the studies all demonstrated a link between structural racism and SMM; additional research is required.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Fed Register. December 12, 2022;87:76046-76048.

Partnerships are needed to motivate, design, and implement lasting innovation in complex situations. This announcement calls for stakeholder insights on the work of the National Healthcare System Action Alliance to Advance Patient Safety and how it can best realize its mission and goals. The deadline for submitting comments is January 26, 2023.

HR 9377, 117th Cong, 2d Sess (2022).

The need for a national government-led patient safety effort has long been advocated for. This legislation outlines the structure of a federal agency to provide support for patient safety data collection, national incident analysis, and recommendation development.
Byrd TE, Ingram LA, Okpara N. Womens Health (Lond). 2022;18:174550572211338.
Maternal near misses are associated with lower quality of life and poorer outcomes for the pregnant person and their family. In this study, 12 Black women who experienced a maternal near miss describe major contributors. They list communication problems, such as not being believed, their relationship with their provider, and provider discrimination as major contributors.

Boston, MA; Institute for Healthcare Improvement: December 2022.

Systemic efforts to improve health equity support patient safety. This announcement highlights an initiative for collective work to address four areas of effort to reduce inequity in health care: access, workforce, social and structural drivers, and quality and safety.
Boxley C, Krevat SA, Sengupta S, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1196-e1202.
COVID-19 changed the way care is delivered to hospitalized patients and resulted in new categories and themes in patient safety reporting. This study used machine learning to group of more than 2,000 patient safety event (PSE) reports into eight clinically relevant themes, including testing delays, diagnostic errors, pressure ulcers, and falls.
Farrell TW, Hung WW, Unroe KT, et al. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2022;70:3366-3377.
Research into the impact of racism on health outcomes has increased in recent years, but there has been less emphasis on ageism or the intersection of ageism and racism. This commentary highlights the ways racism (e.g., clinical algorithms), ageism (e.g., proposed measures to ration care) and the intersection of the two (increased morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 on older people of color) impacts health outcomes. Recommendations for current clinicians and health profession educators are provided.