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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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PSNet Original Content
Displaying 1 - 12 of 12 Results
Fillo KT, Saunders K. Bureau of Health Care Safety and Quality, Department of Public Health. Boston, MA: Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 2023.
This reoccurring report compiles patient safety data collected by Massachusetts hospitals. The 2022 numbers document an increase in serious reportable events recorded in acute care hospitals, from 1430 the previous year to 1632. This presentation also includes events from ambulatory surgery centers. Older reports are also available.

Medscape. 2016–2017.

Improving diagnosis has recently been recognized as a primary focus for patient safety. This collection highlights particular clinical areas of concern such as neurology and infectious disease. The articles offer expert commentary and review strategies to avoid common reasoning errors.
American Hospital Association; AHA.
Hospitals and health systems face challenges in implementing electronic health records that can affect safety. This webinar introduced the SAFER guides, which highlight strategies to improve safety related to electronic health record use, and educate participants about ways to implement these guides in their organizations. The session featured Hardeep Singh and Dean F. Sittig as speakers.
Schneider EB, Hirani SA, Hambridge HL, et al. J Surg Res. 2012;177:295-300.
Being admitted to the hospital on a weekend is potentially dangerous, as studies have shown that preventable complications and mortality are increased across a range of common diagnoses for weekend admissions compared with weekdays. One exception appears to be trauma, as a prior study found equal outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries regardless of the day of admission, a finding ascribed to the protocolized and closely supervised nature of trauma care. However, this study of older adults admitted with traumatic brain injury did find increased mortality for those patients admitted on the weekend, despite the fact that patients admitted on the weekend were less severely injured. A limitation of this study is that the authors were not able to analyze outcomes for patients cared for at specialized trauma centers. Nevertheless, the study adds to the considerable body of research documenting the dangers of weekend hospital admission.
Minei JP, Nathens AB, West M, et al. The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. 2006;60.
The investigators used existing data and guidelines to develop this standard operating procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia.
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
A collection of three educational modules that address key areas of concern in patient safety. These include protecting patients from hospital-acquired infection, minimizing falls and confusion, and emphasizing the value of providers calling for help early when needed. The organization was recognized for this work with the John Eisenberg award in 2004.