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Cohen JB, Patel SY. Anesth Analg. 2021;133(3):816-820.
Designated safety leadership roles are situated to direct and sustain organizational safety progress. This commentary describes an anesthesiology safety officer function and how it is positioned to motivate staff safety behaviors and support engagement during project challenges.

Anjali Joseph, PhD, EDAC, is a Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Endowed Chair in Architecture and Health Design. Molly M. Scanlon, PhD, FAIA, FACHA, is the Director at Phigenics, LLC. We spoke with them about how healthcare built environments have been temporarily modified during the COVID-19 pandemic and what learnings may be used moving forward.

This piece discusses areas where the healthcare built environment may contribute to the risk of COVID-19 transmission, mitigating strategies, and how the pandemic may impact the built environment moving forward.

Marang-van de Mheen PJ, Vincent CA. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;30(7):525-528.
Research has shown that patients admitted to the hospital on the weekend may experience worse outcomes compared to those admitted on weekdays (the ‘weekend effect’). This editorial highlights the challenges to empirically evaluate the underlying mechanisms contributing to the weekend effect. The authors propose viewing the weekend effect as a proxy for staffing levels and the influence of other factors influencing outcomes for patients admitted on weekends, such as patient acuity, clinician skill-mix and access to diagnostic tests or other ancillary services.
Holden RJ, Carayon P. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;Epub May 28.
Since the SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) conceptual model was introduced in 2006, several additional versions have been introduced. In this commentary, the authors of SEIPS 2.0 and SEIPS 3.0 present a practice-oriented SEIPS model (SEIPS 101) along with seven simple tools for use by practitioners, researchers, and others.
Panda N, Sinyard RD, Henrich N, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(4):256-263.
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented numerous challenges for the healthcare workforce, including redeploying personnel to different locations or retraining personnel for different tasks. Researchers interviewed hospital leaders from health systems in the United States, United Kingdom, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea about redeployment of health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors discuss effective practices and lessons learned preparing for and executing workforce redeployment, as well as concerns regarding redeployed personnel
Biquet J-M, Schopper D, Sprumont D, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;Epub Nov 20.
Few medical humanitarian organizations have patient safety reporting and analysis systems. Interviews with medical and paramedical staff working in international humanitarian organizations expressed high expectations for organizational leadership to establish clear patient safety and medical error management policies.  

Sentinel Event Alert. Feb 2, 2021;(62):1-7. 

Safe patient care is reliant on a healthy healthcare workforce. This alert emphasizes organizational conditions and supporting the wellbeing of clinicians under the stress of providing care during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
Braun BI, Chitavi SO, Suzuki H, et al. Curr Infect Dis Rep. 2020;22(12):34.
A culture of safety is a key component to the success of a patient safety program. Despite limited empirical evidence, this review identified a positive relationship between safety culture, improvement in infection prevention and control-related processes, and decreases in healthcare-associated infections. 
Komashie A, Ward JR, Bashford T, et al. BMJ Open. 2021;11(1):e037667.
A systems approach is a key element in safe patient care. This systematic review concluded that a systems approach to healthcare design and delivery can lead to significant improvements in patient and service outcomes (e.g., fewer delays for appointments and time-to-treatment).  
Vimercati L, De Maria L, Quarato M, et al. Int J Infect Dis. 2021;102:532-537.
The pressures faced by hospitals and healthcare providers during the COVID-19 pandemic has raised concerns about nosocomial transmission of the virus. This single-setting study conducted in Italy including 5,750 healthcare workers compared the prevalence of COVID-19 infection among those in contact with COVID-19 patients and those working elsewhere in the hospital. The prevalence among exposed healthcare workers was 0.7% and 0.4% among all healthcare workers at this hospital. The authors conclude that correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and early identification of symptomatic healthcare workers can reduce nosocomial transmission.  
Hillman E, Paul J, Neustadt M, et al. Acad Med. 2020;95(12):1864-1873.
Quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) programs are intended to increase patient safety competency during graduate medical education. This article describes the development and implementation of a consortium aimed to improve QIPS education at a large academic health center. Primary goals of the consortium include to (1) expand learner-driven, interprofessional opportunities, (2) leverage simulation training, and (3) engage and collaborate with community stakeholders.  
Lee M, Lee N-J, Seo H-J, et al. West J Nurs Res. 2020;Epub Dec 24.
Patients and families are essential partners in identifying and preventing safety events. In this systematic review, the authors found that information-based interventions (e.g., videos, offline classes) promoting patient and family engagement in patient safety were mostly effective. The effectiveness of interventions involving both information and involvement (e.g., use of decision aids to determine care plan) strategies was inconsistent.  
Pryce A, Unwin M, Kinsman L, et al. Int Emerg Nurs. 2020;54:100956.
Emergency department (ED) overcrowding and prolonged ED stays can lead to adverse patient outcomes. This study examined patient flow bottlenecks in the ED and several factors posing risks to patient safety, such as prolonged time to triage and use of makeshift spaces (which may have inadequate staffing allocations or lack necessary equipment).
Butler CR, Wong SPY, Wightman AG, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2020;3(11):e2027315.
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to wide-ranging changes to health care delivery. This qualitative study with clinicians in the United States identified three emerging themes describing clinicians’ experience providing care in settings of resource limitations - planning for crisis capacity, adapting to resource limitations, and unprecedented barriers to care delivery. 
LeCraw FR, Stearns SC, McCoy MJ. J Patient Saf Risk Manag. 2021;26(1):34-40.
Healthcare systems have implemented communication-and-resolution programs (CRPs) to respond and disclose serious errors and adverse events. This article describes methods used by nine teams of CRP advocates to encourage adoption and endorsement by hospitals and national medical societies at the national, state, and local levels.  
Trockel MT, Menon NK, Rowe SG, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2020;3(12):e2028111.
Fatigue among health care workers can increase the risk of errors. This large cross-sectional study of attending and house staff physicians found that sleep-related impairment was associated with increased burnout, decreased professional fulfillment, and increased self-reported clinically significant medical error. Organizational policies should focus on reducing sleep-related impairment in order to reduce harm to patients and physicians.