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Barber Doucet H, Ward VL, Johnson TJ, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2021;60(9-10):408-417.
Healthcare provider implicit biases can lead to inequitable care delivery and poorer patient outcomes. Pediatric residents were surveyed about their attitudes, skill level, and preferred educational interventions related to implicit bias and care of diverse populations. Prior medical education or training in diversity and bias-related skills was associated with higher self-reported skill level.
Sidi A, Gravenstein N, Vasilopoulos T, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(6):e490-e496.
Nontechnical skills, such as teamwork and communication, can influence performance in technical fields like surgery or emergency medicine. This study found that simulation-based assessments can measure improvements in nontechnical skills and cognitive performance among residents.
Warm EJ, Ahmad Y, Kinnear B, et al. Acad Med. 2021;96(9):1268-1275.
Technical and procedural skills are an important emphasis of medical training. This article briefly summarizes the “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) approach, which was developed for the nuclear industry and has been used in radiology. The authors outline how ALARA risk standards can be adapted by training program directors to measure procedural competency and assess and reduce bedside procedural risks.
Jagneaux T, Caffery TS, Musso MW, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(6):425-429.
Emergency and internal medicine residents attended a course on central venous access that included lectures, videos, and simulation using a task trainer. Comparison of pre- and post-training evaluation demonstrated significant improvement in knowledge, confidence, and procedural skills.

Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization, teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and trigger tools.

Fatima S, Soria S, Esteban- Cruciani N. BMC Med Educ. 2021;21(1):408.
Healthcare providers who are involved in a medical error and feel guilt, remorse, shame, and anger are sometimes referred to as “second victims”. This mixed-methods study surveyed medical residents about their well-being, coping strategies, and support following a self-perceived medical error. Residents reported feeling fear, shame, and feeling judged, and many used maladaptive strategies to cope.
Fernandez Branson C, Williams M, Chan TM, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;Epub Jul 27.
Receiving feedback from colleagues may improve clinicians’ diagnostic reasoning skills. By building on existing models such as Safer Dx, and collaborating with professionals outside of the healthcare field, researchers developed the Diagnosis Learning Cycle, a model intended to improve diagnosis through peer feedback.
Speaks L, Helmer SD, Quinn KR, et al. J Surg Educ. 2021;Epub Aug 4.
Balancing resident autonomy and supervision is an ongoing challenge in medical training. The authors reviewed patient data to identify adverse outcomes (e.g., complications, readmissions, reoperation, mortality) undergoing common general surgery procedures performed by, or indirectly supervised by, attending surgeons or the chief resident service. Findings suggest that indirect supervision of appendectomies, cholecystectomies, and hernia repairs by the chief resident surgery service is safe and can serve as a model to enhance resident autonomy during training.
Metersky ML, Eldridge N, Wang Y, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;Epub Aug 14.
The July Effect is a belief that the quality of care delivered in academic medical centers decreases during July and August due to the arrival of new trainees. Using data from the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System, this retrospective cohort, including over 185,000 hospital admissions from 2010 to 2017, found that patients admitted to teaching hospitals in July and August did not experience higher rates of adverse events compared to patients admitted to non-teaching hospitals.
Prabhu V, Mikhly M, Chung R, et al. Am J Med Qual. 2021;Epub Jun 11.
Encouraging adverse event reporting among clinicians, including medical trainees, is essential to improving patient safety. This hospital implemented a multi-pronged intervention – using a combination of branding, education and outreach, and feedback – to increase patient safety event reporting by house staff. The intervention led to increased event reporting in the short- and long-term.
Berry P. Postgrad Med J. 2021;Epub Jul 23.
Staff willingness to speak up about patient safety enables organizations to implement improvements to prevent patient harm. The author describes barriers that trainees face when presented with an opportunity to speak up as well as barriers faced by those who receive the reports. Initiatives to improve trainee speaking up behavior are discussed.
Jaam M, Naseralallah LM, Hussain TA, et al. PLOS ONE. 2021;16(6):e0253588.
Including pharmacists can improve patient safety across the medication prescribing continuum. This review identified twelve pharmacist-led educational interventions aimed at improving medication safety. The phase, educational strategy, patient population, and audience varied across studies; however most showed some reductions in medication errors.
Gabrysz-Forget F, Zahabi S, Young M, et al. J Surg Educ. 2021;Epub Apr 24.
An essential part of resident training is error recovery- recognizing an error has occurred and strategizing how to correct the error to maximize patient safety. Through interviews with surgical residents, barriers and facilitators to experience error recovery were supervision, self, surgical context, and situation safeness. Focusing on these factors may enhance residents’ ability to develop their error recovery skills.
Scott IA, Hubbard RE, Crock C, et al. Intern Med J. 2021;51(4):488-493.
Sound critical thinking skills can help clinicians avoid cognitive biases and diagnostic errors. This article describes three critical thinking skills essential to effective clinical care – clinical reasoning, evidence-informed decision-making, and systems thinking – and approaches to develop these skills during clinician training.
Ziemba JB, Berns JS, Huzinec JG, et al. Acad Med. 2021;96(7):997-1001.
Root cause analysis (RCA) is a common method to investigate adverse events and identify contributing factors. To expand resident understanding of and participation in RCA, the authors developed simulated RCAs that were applicable to a broad set of specialties and included other healthcare professionals whose disciplines were involved in the event (e.g., nurses, pharmacists). After participating in the simulated RCAs, there was an increase in trainees understanding of RCA and intent to report adverse events.
Awan M, Zagales I, McKenney M, et al. J Surg Educ. 2021;Epub Jun 30.
In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) updated the duty hour restrictions (DHR) for medical residents to increase resident well-being. This review focused on surgical patient outcomes, resident case volume, and resident quality of life following the implementation of the 2011 update. Results showed DHR did not improve patient safety or surgical resident quality of life. The authors suggest future revisions meant to improve resident well-being not focus solely on hours worked in a single shift or week.
Casciato DJ, Thompson J, Law R, et al. J Foot Ankle Surg. 2021;Epub Jun 4.
The "July Effect" refers to the idea there may be an increase in medical errors in July when newly graduated medical students begin their residencies. In this retrospective chart review of podiatric surgery patients, researchers did not find any statistically significant difference in patient outcomes between surgeries performed during the first quarter of residency (July-September) and the last quarter (April-June). Results suggest robust resident training programs can limit errors that may otherwise occur during this time of transition.  
Chung EH, Truong T, Jooste KR, et al. J Surg Educ. 2021;78(3):942-949.
Medical residents are frequently involved in difficult patient conversations, including error disclosure. This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel communications/didactic skills training program for OB/GYN residents. Immediately, and 3-months after training, residents indicated an improvement in their communication skills.
Wu AW, Vincent CA, Shapiro DW, et al. J Patient Saf Risk Manag. 2021;26(3):93-96.
The July effect is a phenomenon that presumably results in poor care due to the annual en masse introduction of new doctors into practice. This commentary outlines factors undermining the safe influx of these new clinicians into active, independent practice. The authors discuss how a systemic approach is required to situate these practitioners to provide the safest care possible.
Sinha P, Pischel L, Sofair AN. Diagnosis (Berl). 2021;8(2):157-160.
Reducing diagnostic error is essential to patient safety. This article describes the use of structured education sessions and deliberate practice with senior clinicians to improve diagnostic skills among medical residents. These sessions focused on generating differential diagnoses and identifying cognitive errors and knowledge gaps.