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Kukielka E. Patient Saf. 2021;3(3):18-27.
Trauma patients, who often suffer multiple, severe injuries and who may arrive to the Emergency Department (ED) unconscious, are vulnerable to adverse events. Using data reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PSRS), researchers in this study evaluated the safety challenges of caring for patients presenting to the ED after a motor vehicle collision. Common challenges included issues with monitoring, treatment, evaluation, and/or documentation, patient falls, medication errors, and problems with transfers.
Burke HB, King HB. BMJ Open. 2021;11(9):e040779.
This study of US primary care physicians tested their patient safety and quality knowledge. Five topic areas were assessed: 1) patient management, 2) radiation risk, 3) general safety and quality, 4) structure, process, and outcome, and, 5) quality and safety definitions. The average score was 48% correct, indicating additional education in patient safety and quality for practicing primary care physicians is needed.
Stovall M, Hansen L. Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2021;18(5):264-272.
Clinicians who are involved in a patient safety incident often experience significant emotional consequences. This study found that nurses involved in an patient safety incident resulting in patient death were more likely to change jobs, consider leaving the profession, and have suicidal ideation, compared to nurses involved in incidents that did not result in patient harm.

This piece discusses an expanded view of maternal and infant safety that includes the concept of whole-person care, which addresses the structural and social determinants of maternal health.

Alison Stuebe, MD, MSc, is a professor and Division Director for Maternal-Fetal Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and the co-director of the Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health. Kristin Tully, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UNC Chapel Hill and a member of the Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health.

Institute for Healthcare Improvement. December 5-8, 2021.

This virtual conference will offer workshops and interactive sessions exploring strategies from within health care and beyond to improve health care quality. Featured content tracks will include workforce and patient safety, equity, wellbeing at work, and leadership.
American Society for Healthcare Risk Management. October 10-13, 2021 (live); October 25-27, 2021 (virtual).
This virtual session will offer participants a range of educational opportunities that focus on how risk managers can contribute to safe and trusted health care. Sessions will feature topics on support of families after harm and the importance of leadership accountability for highly reliable care.

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

Many graduate medical education programs have instituted patient safety didactics or online courses to meet accreditation standards, but these are likely insufficient in the face of real-world practices commonly witnessed by trainees in clinical settings. Recognizing the importance of this hidden curriculum on shaping trainees' behaviors, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) created the Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) program to evaluate teaching institutions in six focus areas: patient safety, quality improvement, transitions in care, supervision, duty hours, and professionalism. Between June 2017-February 2020, the ACGME visited more than 566 ACGME-accredited institutions as part of this program. According to ACGME leaders, the early findings show an overall lack of trainee engagement in the systems-based practices. Available on the Web site, the latest CLER report describes discoveries from the program and provides a guide for teaching institutions to create clinical environments that support patient safety training and practices.

This case describes multiple emergency department (ED) encounters and hospitalizations experienced by a middle-aged woman with sickle cell crisis and a past history of multiple, long admissions related to her sickle cell disease. The multiple encounters highlight the challenges of opioid prescribing for patients with chronic, non-cancer pain.

A 44-year-old man presented to his primary care physician (PCP) with complaints of new onset headache, photophobia, and upper respiratory tract infections. He had a recent history of interferon treatment for Hepatitis C infection and a remote history of cervical spine surgery requiring permanent spinal hardware. On physical examination, his neck was tender, but he had no neurologic abnormalities. He was sent home from the clinic with advice to take over-the-counter analgesics.

Sauro KM, Machan M, Whalen-Browne L, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;Epub Sep 2.
Hospital adverse events are common and can contribute to serious patient harm. This systematic review included 94 studies (representing 590 million admissions from 25 countries) examining trends in hospital adverse events from 1961 to 2014. Findings indicate that hospital adverse events have increased over time and that over half are considered preventable.
Sood N, Lee RE, To JK, et al. Birth. 2021;Epub Sep 8.
Cesarean delivery can contribute to increased maternal morbidity. This retrospective study found that the introduction of a hospital-wide perioperative bundle significantly reduced surgical site infection rates. The perioperative bundle consisted of five elements (1) an antibiotic protocol, (2) preoperative warming and intraoperative maintenance of normal temperature, (3) standardized surgical preparation for each patient, (4) use of standardized fascial closure trays, and (5) standardized intraoperative application of wound dressing. 
Becker C, Zumbrunn S, Beck K, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(8):e2119346.
Discharge from the hospital represents a vulnerable time for patients. This systematic review assessed the impact of discharge communication on hospital readmissions, adherence to treatment regimen, patient satisfaction, mortality, and emergency department visits 30 days after hospital discharge. Findings suggest that improved communication at discharge reduced 30-day hospital readmissions and increased adherence to treatment regimen.

The handshake antimicrobial stewardship program (HS-ASP) was developed and implemented at Children’s Hospital Colorado (CHCO). In 2014, the CHOC HS-ASP team began labeling specific interventions as “Great Catches” which were considered to have altered, or had the potential to alter, the patient’s trajectory of care. CHOC researchers used these "Great Catches" to identify potential diagnostic errors.

Morbidity and mortality (M&M) conferences are standard components of medical training programs yet medical residents underutilize incident reporting systems that feed into M&M conferences. To encourage incident reporting among residents, the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Cedars Sinai Medical Center launched a web-based, real-time complication reporting platform to capture complications.

Medication administration errors are a common source of patient harm. Developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC), MED.Safe is an automated software package designed to monitor high-risk intravenous (IV) medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and identify medication administration discrepancies.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. October 6, 2021. 10:30 AM - 5:30 PM (eastern).

Diagnostic errors remain an ongoing challenge in many medical specialties, including oncology. This workshop will review the evidence base examining challenges in cancer diagnosis, discuss suggestions for improvement in the field, and look toward a safer future for cancer patients.
Arntson E, Dimick JB, Nuliyalu U, et al. Ann Surg. 2021;274(4):e301-e307.
Hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) are thought to be preventable, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reduce payments to hospitals with the highest rates of these conditions through its Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program (HACRP). This study evaluated surgical HACs at three timepoints: before Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation, after ACA implementation, and after HACRP. While the number of HACs continued to decline after implementation of HACRP, it did not affect 30-day mortality.