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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 36 Results

The Leapfrog Group.

Examination of diagnostic failure and identification of reduction strategies require multidisciplinary expertise to be successful. This collaborative initiative will initially develop educational materials to inform health care organization adoption of diagnostic improvement best practices. Building on that experience, a survey component to complement the Leapfrog annual survey will be developed to enhance measurement and motivate improvement.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Surveys are established mechanisms for organizational assessment of safety culture. This collection of webinars provides an overview of the AHRQ Surveys on Patient Safety Culture™ (SOPS®) and a range of content related to the successful use of the surveys. Topics covered include organizational characteristics required for successful web-based distribution of the survey and best practices for formatting, programming, and administering the surveys in a variety of environments. 
Ash JS, Corby S, Mohan V, et al. J Amer Med Inform Assoc. 2021;28:294-302.
The use of medical scribes for electronic health record (EHR) documentation is one strategy to shift the burden of documentation away from clinicians. Using interviews and direct observations, the authors explored the effects of scribes on patient safety. Participants did not perceive significant patient safety risks with scribes and highlighted the positive effects scribes have on documentation efficiency, quality, and safety.

Washington DC; National Quality Forum: October 6, 2020.

With input from a stakeholder committee, the National Quality Forum identified recommendations for the practical application of the Diagnostic Process and Outcomes domain of the 2017 Measurement Framework  for measuring and improving diagnostic error and patient safety. The committee developed four ‘use cases’ (missed subtle clinical findings; communication failures; information overload; and dismissed patients) reflecting high priority examples of diagnostic error that can result in patient harm. The report includes comprehensive, broad-scope, actionable, and specific recommendations for implementing quality improvement activities to engage patients, educate clinicians, leverage technology, and support a culture of safety with the goal of reducing diagnostic errors. 
Meyer AND, Upadhyay DK, Collins CA, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2021;47:120-126.
Efforts to reduce diagnostic error should include educational strategies for improving diagnosis. This article describes the development of a learning health system around diagnostic safety at one large, integrated health care system. The program identified missed opportunities in diagnosis based on clinician reports, patient complaints, and risk management, and used trained facilitators to provide feedback to clinicians about these missed opportunities as learning opportunities. Both facilitators and recipients found the program to be useful and believed it would improve future diagnostic safety. 
Duhn L, Godfrey C, Medves J. Health Expect. 2020;23:979-991.
This scoping review characterized the evidence base on patients’ attitudes and behaviors concerning their engagement in ensuring the safety of their care. The review found increasing interest in patient and family engagement in safety and identified several research gaps, such as a need to better understand patients’ attitudes across the continuum of care, the role of family members, and engagement in primary care safety practices.

Paediatric International Patient Safety and Quality Community. 525 University Ave, Suite 630, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2L3, Canada.

The safety of children receiving health care is a recognized challenge. This community provides educational and collaborative opportunities for specialists seeking to improve the safety of pediatric patient populations. It recently expanded its content to include a new section on COVID-19 and Patient Safety.
Kumar PR, Nash DB. Am J Med Qual. 2020;36:185-196.
The outpatient setting is receiving increased attention as a research focus in patient safety. This bibliography provides an annotated list of articles summarizing safety improvement efforts in the ambulatory setting since 2016. Topics explored include safety culture, measurement, team training, test result management, incident reporting, and diagnostic error.
Suda KJ, Zhou J, Rowan SA, et al. Am J Prev Med. 2020;58:473-486.
National guidelines published in 2016 recommend prescribing low-dose opioids for short durations when necessary, including in dentistry practices. This cross-sectional analysis of over 500,000 commercial dental patients over a five-year period (2011-2015) examined prescribing practices prior to the recommendations and found that 29% of prescribed opioids exceeded the recommended dose for management of acute pain and half (53%) exceeded the recommended days’ supply. The authors emphasize the importance of evidence-based interventions tailored to dentistry to curtail excessive opioid prescribing.
Ding JM, Ehrenfeld JM, Edmiston EK, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2020;46:37-43.
This article describes the development and implementation of a multifaceted, community-engaged program to improving the quality of healthcare for transgender and gender nonconforming patients. The program – which includes transgender patient advocacy, a community advisory board, and a transgender health clinic – serves as a model that can be adopted by other health care systems.
Bundy DG, Singh H, Stein RE, et al. Clin Trials. 2019;16:154-164.
Diagnostic errors in pediatric primary care are common and represent an ongoing patient safety challenge. In this stepped-wedge, cluster-randomized trial, researchers were able to successfully recruit a diverse group of pediatric primary care practices to participate in virtual quality improvement collaboratives designed to reduce diagnostic error.
Washington, DC: Association of American Medical Colleges; 2019.
Curricula support the development and assessment of domain-centric performance. This document recommends subjects to be included at three levels of physician skill development in patient safety. Topics covered include foundations to the specialty, quality improvement, patient and family partnerships, team function, collaboration and organization and health equity.
Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2018.
Diagnostic error prevention in primary care is a persistent challenge. This AHRQ-funded toolkit provides guidance for ambulatory care organizations that seek to improve the reliability of diagnosis in children. The material focuses on tactics to enhance how practices recognize, track, and follow up on adolescent depression, pediatric elevated blood pressure, and actionable laboratory results.
Darnall BD, Ziadni MS, Stieg RL, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2018;178:707-708.
This prospective cohort study found that many outpatients treated at a chronic pain clinic were willing to voluntarily taper opioid medications. Although nearly 40% of patients dropped out of the study, those that remained significantly reduced their opioid dosing. The authors suggest that offering a voluntary gradual opioid taper to patients with chronic pain may reduce their opioid dose.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; April 2018.
Patient engagement in the process of care is important to improve safety in primary care. This guide includes case studies and highlights handoffs, teach-back, tools to prepare patients for appointments, and brown-bag medication management as strategies to encourage patients and caregivers to participate in safety.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2016. AHRQ Publication No. 16-0035-2-EF.
Patient safety in ambulatory care is receiving increased attention. This guide includes case studies that explore how Open Notes, team-based care delivery, and patient and family advisory committees have shown promise as patient engagement and safety improvement mechanisms in primary care settings.
Berry JC, Davis JT, Bartman T, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16:130-136.
A culture of safety is a fundamental component of patient safety. Several validated survey tools are available to measure hospital safety and teamwork climates, including the AHRQ Surveys on Patient Safety Culture and the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Improvements in SAQ scores have been previously linked to reductions in specific safety outcomes, such as maternal and fetal adverse events in an obstetric ward. This study explored SAQ results and outcomes across all inpatient and outpatient care units in a large academic health system. Beginning in 2009, Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio introduced a comprehensive patient safety and high reliability program that included numerous quality improvement activities and extensive training in error prevention for each of their approximately 10,000 employees. Over the course of 4 years, SAQ scores improved while all-hospital harm, serious safety events, and severity-adjusted hospital mortality all decreased significantly. A prior WebM&M interview with J. Bryan Sexton, the primary author of the SAQ instrument, discussed the relationship between culture and safety.
501 Boylston Street, 5th Floor, Boston, MA, 02116 info@BetsyLehmanCenterMA.gov
The Betsy Lehman Center is a nonregulatory Massachusetts state agency named for Betsy Lehman, the Boston Globe columnist who died due to an inadvertent chemotherapy overdose. The Center works to support a statewide program coordinating health care organization and provider efforts to reduce medical errors, enabling patients to participate in safety improvement, and disseminating information about best practices.

ISMP Canada. SafeMedicationUse Newsletter. December 2, 2014;5:1-2.

This newsletter article describes an incident involving a patient who noticed that the tablets in her prescription refill had a different marking than usual, alerting her that she might have received an incorrect medication which was confirmed by the pharmacist. Tips for patients to avoid medication errors include being familiar with how their medicines look and checking prescriptions before leaving the pharmacy. Practitioners can help prevent these errors by counting and labeling prescriptions one at a time and performing patient consultations.