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Korenstein D, Harris RP, Elshaug AG, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2021;36:2105-2110.
Provider and patient underestimation of harms of tests and treatments may lead to over treatment. This article presents seven domains of harm of tests and treatment which warrant comprehensive research: (1) physical impairment, (2) psychological distress, (3) social disruption, (4) disruption in connection to healthcare, (5) labeling, (6) financial impact, and (7) treatment burden. Research is especially important in vulnerable patient populations.
Mcmullan RD, Urwin R, Gates PJ, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2021;33:mzab068.
Distractions in the operating room are common and can lead to errors. This systematic review including 27 studies found that distractions, interruptions, and disruptions in the operating room are associated with a range of negative outcomes. These include longer operative duration, impaired team performance, self-reported errors by colleagues, surgical errors, surgical site infections, and fewer patient safety checks.
Sharp R, Turner L, Altschwager J, et al. J Clin Nurs. 2021;30:1751-1759.
Safety in home health care delivery is receiving increasing attention. This retrospective cohort study found that patients with medically stable, chronic conditions undergoing blood transfusion in a home setting provided by a nurse-led service experienced low rates of adverse events.
Zheng WY, Lichtner V, Van Dort BA, et al. Res Soc Admin Pharm. 2021;17:832-841.
This systematic review sought to determine the impact of automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs), barcode medication administration (BCMA), and closed-loop electronic medication management systems (EMMS) used by hospitals in reducing controlled substance medication errors in hospitals. Overall, only 4 studies (out of 16) focused directly on controlled medications. A variety of types of errors (e.g., log-in, data, entry, override) compromised patient safety. High-quality targeted research is urgently needed to evaluate the risks and benefits of medication-related technology.
Berry D, Wakefield E, Street M, et al. J Adv Nurs. 2020;76:2235-2252.
Isolation for infection prevention and control is beneficial but may result in unintended consequences for patients (e.g., less attention, suboptimal documentation and communication, higher risk of preventable adverse events). This systematic review did not identify any evidence suggesting that adult patients in isolation precautions for infection control are more likely to experience clinical deterioration or hospital-acquired complications compared to non-insolated patients.
Dell-Kuster S, Gomes NV, Gawria L, et al. BMJ. 2020;370:m2917.
This cohort study enrolled 18 sites across 12 countries to assess the validity of a newly developed classification system (ClassIntra v1.0) for assessing intraoperative adverse events. Results indicate that the tool has high criterion validity and can be incorporated into routine practice in perioperative surgical safety checklists or used as a monitoring/reporting tool.
Chung L, Kumar S, Oldfield J, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e115-e123.
This systematic review investigated the use of anatomical side markers (ASM), which are used in radiology to identify the correct anatomical side and prevent confusion. The seven studies included demonstrated that use of ASMs is common, but the literature documented some barriers to use, such as risk of obscuring essential anatomical parts.
Freeling M, Rainbow JG, Chamberlain D. Int J Nurs Stud. 2020;109:103659.
This literature analysis assessed the evidence on the impact presenteeism in the nursing workforce and found that presenteeism is associated with risk to nurse well-being and patient safety, but that additional research exploring the relationship between presenteeism, job satisfaction, and quality of care is needed.
Haghani M, Bliemer MCJ, Goerlandt F, et al. Safety Sci. 2020;129:104806.
This review discusses the most common research on COVID-19 and safety issues to date (e.g., occupational safety of heath professionals, patient transport safety) and identifies several safety issues attributable to the pandemic which have been relatively understudied, including issues around supply-chain safety and occupational safety of non-healthcare essential workers.
Wiig S, Hibbert PD, Braithwaite J. Int J Qual Health Care. 2020;32.
The authors discuss how involving families in the investigations of fatal adverse events can improve the investigations by broadening perspectives and providing new information, but can also present challenges due to emotions, trust, and potential conflicts in perspectives between providers and families.
Borradale H, Andersen P, Wallis M, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020.
In this integrative literature review, the authors discuss the evidence on how misreading injectable medications can contribute to medication errors and whether interventions to increase the readability of these medications can reduce errors. The review identified three factors – environmental light levels, medication labels, and clinician factors – that may contribute to misleading injectable medications; however the literature did not provide definitive conclusions on intervention effectiveness.  

Int J Qual Health Care. 2020;32(Supp1):1-105.

Quality and safety are often intertwined in large improvement efforts. This special issue outlies the results of a 5-year examination of 32 hospitals across Australia and its territories. The culture of organizations, assessing that culture from the leadership, patient and clinician perspectives and adopting a “Safety II” approach can impact conditions that affect quality and safety.