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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 11 of 11 Results
Baughman AW, Triantafylidis LK, O'Neil N, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2021;47:646-653.
Medication reconciliation is the process of reviewing a patient’s medication list for discrepancies and safety. Patients in nursing homes are at increased risk for medication discrepancies due to complexity of care and frequent transitions of care. By using Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), researchers uncovered several factors that contribute to medication discrepancies. Interventions to improve medication safety can be targeted to one or more of the contributing factors.
Adams KT, Pruitt Z, Kazi S, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e988-e994.
It is important to consider unintended consequences when implementing new tools, such as health information technology (HIT). This study reviewed 2,700 patient safety event reports to identify the type of medication error, the stage in the process in which the error occurred, and how HIT usability issues contributed to the errors. Errors in dosing were the most frequent type, and occurred during ordering or reviewing. Most errors described usability issues which should be considered and addressed to improve medication safety.
J Patient Saf. 2020;16:s1-s56.
The patient safety evidence base has been growing exponentially for two decades with noted expansion into the non-acute care environment. This special issue highlights eight articles illustrating the range of practices examined in the AHRQ Making Healthcare Safer III report, including rapid response teams and failure to rescue, deprescribing practices and opioid stewardship.   
Choudhury A, Asan O. JMIR Med Inform. 2020;8:e18599.
This systematic review explored how artificial intelligence (AI) based on machine learning algorithms and natural language processing is used to address and report patient safety outcomes. The review suggests that AI-enabled decision support systems can improve error detection, patient stratification, and drug management, but that additional evidence is needed to understand how well AI can predict safety outcomes.  
Larouzee J, Le Coze J-C. Safety Sci. 2020;126:104660.
This article describes the development of the “Swiss cheese model,” (SCM) and the main criticisms of this model and the motivation for these criticisms.  The article concludes that the SCM remains a relevant model because of its systemic foundations and its sustained use in high-risk industries and encourages safety science researchers and practitioners to continue imagining alternatives combining empirical, practical and graphical approaches.
Farag A, Vogelsmeier A, Knox K, et al. J Gerontol Nurs. 2020;46.
Using a random sample of 500 nursing home nurses in one state, this study tested a proposed predictive model assessing nurses’ willingness to report medication near-misses. On a scale from 0 to 3 (where high scores indicate more willingness to report) the mean score of nurses’ willingness to report near-miss incidents was 1.79. The model predicted a 19% variance in willingness to report. The strongest predictors of willingness to report were non-punitive safety climate, transformational leadership, trusting relationships with nurse managers, and familiarity with the reporting system. The authors conclude that social and system factors are necessary to improve nurses’ voluntary reporting of medication near-misses.
Scott IA, Pillans PI, Barras M, et al. Ther Adv Drug Saf. 2018;9:559-573.
The prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications is a quality and safety concern. This narrative review found that information technologies equipped with decision support tools were modestly effective in reducing inappropriate prescribing of medications, more so in the hospital than the ambulatory environment.
WebM&M Case July 1, 2008
An elderly man receiving feedings through a percutaneous enterostomy tube was prescribed intravenous total parenteral nutrition (TPN). A licensed practical nurse (LPN) mistakenly connected the TPN to the patient's enterostomy tube. His daughter (a retired nurse) asked her about it, and the RN on duty confirmed the error. The LPN disconnected the mistakenly placed (and now contaminated) line, but then prepared to attach it to the intravenous catheter. Luckily, both the patient's daughter and the RN were present and stopped her.
WebM&M Case July 1, 2003
Inadequate monitoring and management of warfarin places patient at significant risk of harm.