Skip to main content

The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

Search All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8 Results
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...

Herd P, Moynihan D. Health Affairs Health Policy Brief. October 2, 2020.

The crossover of health equity concepts to patient safety has emerged as a consideration for improvement. This policy brief examines how administrative burdens can separate patients from the care they need and calls for increased attention to the problem.  

Auraaen A, Saar K, Klazinga N for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. OECD Publishing, Paris, France; 2020. OECD Health Working Papers, No. 120.

Policies, laws, and guidelines aid organizations to develop, prioritize and achieve patient safety goals. This report examined a 25-country analysis of patient safety governance efforts and found that learning and non-punitive approaches are strategies being progressively implemented worldwide.

London, UK: The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman; July 15, 2020. ISBN 9781528620666.

Patient and family complaints can provide insights into system weaknesses if managed effectively. This report examined complaint handling at the United Kingdom National Health Service. The analysis found that lack of training, consistency and learning orientation reduced the effectiveness of the effort.
Hewitt M, Hernandez LM; Roundtable on Health Literacy, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Institute of Medicine. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2014. ISBN: 9780309303651.
Health literacy can affect patients' ability to understand directions, ask good questions, and participate in care. Framing health literacy as a public health challenge, this report describes efforts to address it in three states and explores implementation and research to improve it across the United States.

Dalton D, Williams N. London, UK: The Royal College of Surgeons of England; March 2014. 

When medical errors occur, patients desire full disclosure. This report calls for clinicians in the National Health Service to disclose errors that contribute to moderate or severe harm or death. The authors outline recommendations to help organizations establish a safety culture that requires discussion about unanticipated events and ensures that staff receive training in apologies.

Roundtable on Joy and Meaning in Work and Workforce Safety, The Lucian Leape Institute. Boston, MA: National Patient Safety Foundation; 2013.

The Lucian Leape Institute hosted two roundtables and multiple focus groups to explore the need to create safer working conditions for health care professionals. This report highlights the current state of health care workplaces, which subject many health care workers to emotional and physical harms in the course of providing care. The authors also explicitly link workplace safety to patient safety, noting that poor working conditions place caregivers at higher risks for making medical errors. The report outlines seven strategies for organizations to improve workplace safety, challenging health care centers to become effective high-reliability organizations that are committed to continuous learning, improvement, teamwork, and transparency. An AHRQ interview with Dr. Lucian Leape describes his remarkable career at the forefront of the patient safety movement.

Smedley BD, Stith AY, Nelson AR, eds and Institute of Medicine. Washington, DC; The National Academies Press: 2003. ISBN 9780309082655.

Patient race and socioeconomic disparities result in biases that affect patient safety. This publication examines strategies to minimize these impacts such as interpreter use, localized care delivery, and improved data collection to better ascertain the true state of the problem and design initiatives to address it.