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Quach ED, Kazis LE, Zhao S, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2021;21:842.
The safety climate in nursing homes influences patient safety. This study of frontline staff and managers from 56 US Veterans Health Administration community living centers found that organizational readiness to change predicted safety climate. The authors suggest that nursing home leadership explore readiness for change in order to help nursing homes improve their safety climate.

Center for Healthy Aging--New York Academy of Medicine, Yale School of Nursing.

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) challenge safety in long-term care. This toolkit highlights multidisciplinary approaches to reducing HAIs and teaching tools focused on distinct audiences across the continuum to share principles and tactics supporting improvement.
Damery S, Flanagan S, Jones J, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18:7581.
Hospital admissions and preventable adverse events, such as falls and pressure ulcers, are common in long-term care. In this study, care home staff were provided skills training and facilitated support. After 24 months, the safety climate had improved, and both falls and pressure ulcers were reduced.

Silver-Greenberg J, Gebeloff R. New York Times. March 13, 2021.

The value of rating systems can be challenged by bias and misinterpretation due to a variety of factors. This article outlines how nursing home patients fell victim to both systemic and care failings in the US nursing homes, yet their facilities still ranked high in a national rating system. The authors discuss failures including the lack of data auditing and a focus on ratings rather than quality.

Jaffe S. Medpage Today. November 25, 2020.

Infection control is a primary safety mechanism that presents challenges for nursing homes. This news story highlights a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services program to fine nursing homes for infection control lapses during the COVID pandemic and discusses the potential residual impacts of the strategy.

Diagnosis (Berl)2020;7(4):345-411.

COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that harbors a variety of diagnostic, treatment, and management hurdles. This special issue covers a variety of clinical topics including optimal diagnostic methods, near misses, and diagnostic accuracy.   

Boston, MA: Institute for Healthcare Improvement: September 2020.  

This National Action Plan developed by the National Steering Committee for Patient Safety – a group of 27 national organizations convened by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement – provides direction for health care leaders and organizations to implement and adapt effective tactics and supportive actions to establish the recommendations laid out in the plan. Its areas of focus include culture, leadership, and governance, patient and family engagement, workforce safety and learning systems.  
McGarry BE, Grabowski DC, Barnett ML. Health Aff (Milwood). 2020;39:1812-1821.
Based on data from the CMS COVID-19 Nursing Home Database, this study found that more than 20% of nursing homes report a severe shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) and shortage of staff; rates for staffing and PPE did not improve from May to July of 2020. Nursing homes with COVID-19 cases among residents and staff, and those with lower quality scores, were more likely to report shortages.
J Patient Saf. 2020;16:s1-s56.
The patient safety evidence base has been growing exponentially for two decades with noted expansion into the non-acute care environment. This special issue highlights eight articles illustrating the range of practices examined in the AHRQ Making Healthcare Safer III report, including rapid response teams and failure to rescue, deprescribing practices and opioid stewardship.   
Choudhury A, Asan O. JMIR Med Inform. 2020;8:e18599.
This systematic review explored how artificial intelligence (AI) based on machine learning algorithms and natural language processing is used to address and report patient safety outcomes. The review suggests that AI-enabled decision support systems can improve error detection, patient stratification, and drug management, but that additional evidence is needed to understand how well AI can predict safety outcomes.  
Quach ED, Kazis LE, Zhao S, et al. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2021;22:388-392.
This cross-sectional study examined the impact of safety climate on adverse events occurring in Veterans Administration (VA) nursing homes and community living centers. Survey results suggest that nursing homes may reduce adverse events by increasing supportive supervision and a safer physical environment. The survey found that supervisor commitment to safety was associated with lower rates of major injuries from falls and catheter use, and that environmental safety was associated with lower rates of pressure ulcers, major injuries from falls, and catheter use.
Huetteman E. Kaiser Health News. 2020;August 12.
Health care workers are known to work while unwell due to stigma, commitment, and personal finances. This article discusses presenteeism in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It discusses challenges for individuals who feel organizational pressure to return to work despite health concerns for themselves, their families, and their patients.   
Stall NM, Jones A, Brown KA, et al. CMAJ. 2020;192:e946-e955 .
The authors conducted a retrospective study of all long-term care facilities in Ontario, Canada, to explore the association between for-profit status and the risk of COVID-19 outbreaks and deaths between March 29 and May 20, 2020. Results indicate that, compared to nonprofit facilities, for-profit status is associated with the extent of an outbreak and the number of resident deaths but not with the likelihood of an outbreak.
Stevis-Gridneff M, Apuzzo M, Pronczuk M. New York Times. 2020;August 8.
Residential care facilities have been challenged by COVID-19. This story examines the weakness of care processes in nursing homes in Europe that have been revealed due to the pandemic. Data gaps, resource allocation choices, and hospital space considerations are noted situations that have resulted in unintended consequences, reducing the safety of care for this at-risk population. 
Yong E. The Atlantic. 2020;September.
This article takes a holistic view of the multiple preventable failures of the U.S. in managing the COVID-19 pandemic, raising several patient safety issues from the metasystems perspective. The piece highlights systemic problems such as lack of transparency, investment in public health and learning from experience.
Larouzee J, Le Coze J-C. Safety Sci. 2020;126:104660.
This article describes the development of the “Swiss cheese model,” (SCM) and the main criticisms of this model and the motivation for these criticisms.  The article concludes that the SCM remains a relevant model because of its systemic foundations and its sustained use in high-risk industries and encourages safety science researchers and practitioners to continue imagining alternatives combining empirical, practical and graphical approaches.
Dolan J, Mejia B. Los Angeles Times. 2020;July 24.
Worker safety has ramifications for patient care in both routine and crisis situations. This story highlights a testing gap that has the potential to degrade efforts to minimize the spread of COVID-19 in nursing homes: the lack of coronavirus testing of inspectors visiting the facilities to assess infection prevention readiness.  
Khazan O. The Atlantic. 2020;July 6.
Residential care facilities have been particularly challenged by COVID-19. This article outlines how lack of access to protective equipment, staff training, accurate statistics and effective employee testing have hindered the ability of nursing homes to protect patients and staff from the virus.