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Chicago, IL: National Collaborative for Improving the Clinical Learning Environment; 2021. ISBN: 9781945365416.

Health care provision requires continuous learning to enhance skills, collaboration, and system awareness. This report discusses characteristics of an environment that nurtures learning across disciplines in health care. It centers on 6 areas of focus: patient safety, quality, teaming, supervision, well-being, and professionalism.

Irvine, CA: The Patient Safety Movement Foundation; 2021.

Blood transfusion mistakes can result in severe adverse events. This report shares successful strategies to reduce transfusion process errors. The document highlights patient assessment, process standardization, and cross-disciplinary team building as steps toward improving transfusion safety.
California Hospital Patient Safety Organization. Sacramento, CA; 2021.
Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs) capture and analyze local data to inform learning among their members. This report highlights 2020 trends, activities, and outcomes of initiatives at a 21-state PSO. Sections of the report include high-level review of reported medication events, safe table data analysis, and strategies to improve data quality.
Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services.
Detailing results of an error reporting initiative in New Jersey, these reports explain how consumers can use this information and provides tips for safety when obtaining health care. A section highlights findings related to patient safety indicators.

Uhl S, Siddique SM, McKeever L, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; October 2021.  AHRQ Publication No. 21(22)-EHC035.

Patient malnutrition is an underrecognized threat to patient safety. This report provides a comprehensive evidence analysis on the patient malnutrition literature, the relationship of in-hospital malnutrition to patient harm across patient groups and tactics for measurement of the problem to design and assess the impact of interventions.
Okemos, MI: Michigan Health & Hospital Association.
This publication annually reports on the successful outcomes of the Michigan Keystone Center collaborative activities. This most current year's achievements include submission of 134 root cause analysis to the state patient safety organization reporting system. Areas of focus for improvement work included obstetrical safety, workplace safety, and COVID-19 and infection control.

Bajaj K, de Roche A, Goffman D. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2021. AHRQ Publication No. 20(21)-0040-6-EF.

Maternal safety is threatened by systemic biases, care complexities, and diagnostic issues. This issue brief explores the role of diagnostic error in maternal morbidity and mortality, the preventability of common problems such as maternal hemorrhage, and the importance of multidisciplinary efforts to realize improvement. The brief focuses on events occurring during childbirth and up to a week postpartum.
Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; October 2021.
This annual analysis explores rates of health care-associated infections (HAIs) reported in the United States. Data from 2020 revealed increases in central line–associated bloodstream infections and other infections while a decrease in surgical site infections. The current report also discusses the impact of COVID-19 on reporting and data submission efforts.

Washington, DC: Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General; August 26, 2021. Report No. 21-01502-240.

Organizational assessments often provide insights that address overarching quality and safety challenges. This extensive inspection report shares findings from inspections of 36 Veterans Health Administration care facilities. Recommendations drawn from the analysis call for improvements in suicide death review, root cause analysis result application, and safety committee action item implementation.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2021.

Misdiagnosis of severe cardiovascular events is a primary concern to the diagnostic safety community due to its prevalence and potential for harm. This report summarizes a session discussion on the existing evidence base on improving diagnosis for these conditions and explore opportunities for improvement.

Washington, DC: Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Inspector General.  July 29, 2021. Report No. 21-00657-197.

Care coordination effectiveness is tested by time, hierarchy, and practice silos. This report examines allegations affecting medication access enabled by poor communication, workforce absences, and the built environment challenges. While care coordination challenges in this case were unsubstantiated, the report highlights lack of clinical review and inaccurate analysis of patient death as concerns.

Gangopadhyaya A. Washington DC; Urban Institute: July 2021.

Racial inequities have been revealed by the COVID pandemic as a distinct patient safety concern. This report examined racial differences using patient safety indicators to measure hospital-acquired conditions, insurance coverage, and hospital patient population. The results indicate Black patients have reduced safety, that insurance coverage had little influence on safety and hospitals with a higher Black patient population experienced more adverse events that those serving a white patient population.
Schneider EC, Shah S, Doty M, et al. New York, NY: The Commonwealth Fund; August 2021.
A cross-national survey of consumers and physicians reveals that, despite its costliness, the United States health care system continues to rank lower than other countries in quality of care performance.

Washington, DC: Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Inspector General. June 24, 2021. Report No. 19-09808-171.

This report examined veterans' health clinic use of telemental health to identify safety challenges inherent in this approach before the expansion of telemedine during the COVID-19 crisis. The authors note the complexities in managing emergent mental health situations in virtual consultations. Recommendations for improvement included emergency preparedness planning, specific reporting of telemental health incidents and organized access to experts.

Saks M, Landsman S. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2021.  ISBN: 9780190667986.

A weave of systemic factors contributes to the persistent presence of error in medicine. This publication summarizes the development of the patient safety movement and discusses legal and policy approaches as promising avenues for generating the changes needed to reduce iatrogenic harm and sustain improvement.

Rosen M, Ali KJ, Buckley BO, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; June 2021. AHRQ Publication No. 20(21)-0040-5-EF.

The mindset on diagnostic error improvement has gone from a focus on individual skills to that of system factors. This issue brief highlights the influence health system executives have on amending the care environment to facilitate the most effective environment for diagnostic accuracy. This is part of a publication series examining diagnostic improvement across health care.

Cleghorn E. New York, NY: Dutton; 2021. ISBN: 9780593182956.

Women have been affected by implicit bias that undermines the safety of their care and trust in the medical system. This book shares the history anchoring the mindsets driving ineffective care for women and a discussion of the author’s long-term lupus misdiagnosis.

Office of Inspector General. June 2, 2021. Report No. 18-02496-157.

Health systems can exacerbate potential risk for patient harm due to clinician impairment and unprofessional activities. This report examines a long-term situation that, due to failure of reporting and other system issues, enabled over 3,000 diagnostic delay injuries stemming from specimen errors associated with one pathologist.

Leape LL. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature; 2021. ISBN: 9783030711252.

The publication of “Error in Medicine” by Dr. Lucian Leape marked a pivotal step in the launch of the modern patient safety movement. In this publication, Dr. Leape shares insights stemming from his notable career in safety to outline milestones in the current effort to reduce patient harm due to medical mistakes.