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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 194 Results
Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services.
Detailing results of an error reporting initiative in New Jersey, these reports explain how consumers can use this information and provides tips for safety when obtaining health care. A section highlights findings related to patient safety indicators.
Perspective on Safety October 6, 2021

This piece discusses an expanded view of maternal and infant safety that includes the concept of whole-person care, which addresses the structural and social determinants of maternal health.

Perspective on Safety October 6, 2021

Alison Stuebe, MD, MSc, is a professor and Division Director for Maternal-Fetal Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and the co-director of the Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health. Kristin Tully, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UNC Chapel Hill and a member of the Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health.

Sauro KM, Machan M, Whalen-Browne L, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e1285-e1295.
Hospital adverse events are common and can contribute to serious patient harm. This systematic review included 94 studies (representing 590 million admissions from 25 countries) examining trends in hospital adverse events from 1961 to 2014. Findings indicate that hospital adverse events have increased over time and that over half are considered preventable.
Sood N, Lee RE, To JK, et al. Birth. 2022;49:141-146.
Cesarean delivery can contribute to increased maternal morbidity. This retrospective study found that the introduction of a hospital-wide perioperative bundle significantly reduced surgical site infection rates. The perioperative bundle consisted of five elements (1) an antibiotic protocol, (2) preoperative warming and intraoperative maintenance of normal temperature, (3) standardized surgical preparation for each patient, (4) use of standardized fascial closure trays, and (5) standardized intraoperative application of wound dressing. 
Weiner-Lastinger LM, Pattabiraman V, Konnor RY, et al. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2022;43:12-25.
Using data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network, this study identified significant increases in the incidence of healthcare-associated infections from 2019 to 2020. The authors conclude that these findings suggest a need to return to conventional infection control and prevention practices and prepare for future pandemics.
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...

Gangopadhyaya A. Washington DC; Urban Institute: July 2021.

Racial inequities have been revealed by the COVID pandemic as a distinct patient safety concern. This report examined racial differences using patient safety indicators to measure hospital-acquired conditions, insurance coverage, and hospital patient population. The results indicate Black patients have reduced safety, that insurance coverage had little influence on safety and hospitals with a higher Black patient population experienced more adverse events that those serving a white patient population.
Barbara L, Roberta DB, Vanda R, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18(2):e480-e488.
Patient safety indicators can help hospitals identify and prevent potential adverse events. Researchers in this study developed a conceptual framework for monitoring patient safety and a set of fifteen actionable patient safety indicators.
WebM&M Case July 28, 2021

A 61-year-old male was admitted for a right total knee replacement under regional anesthesia. The surgeon – unaware that the anesthesiologist had already performed a right femoral nerve block with 20 ml (100mg) of 0.5% racemic bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia – also infiltrated the arthroplasty wound with 200 mg of ropivacaine. The patient was sedated with an infusion of propofol throughout the procedure.

Masonbrink AR, Harris M, Hall M, et al. Hosp Pediatr. 2021;11(6):e95-e100.

This study analyzed Pediatric Quality Indicators (PDIs) to compare pediatric safety events before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results indicate an increased risk for overall PDIs, but only postoperative sepsis showed increased odds. Given the continuing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, and risk of future pandemics, more efforts are needed to ensure the safety of pediatric patients.
Kepner S, Jones RM. Patient Saf. 2021;3:6-21.
Acute healthcare facilities in Pennsylvania are required to report all events of harm or potential harm to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PSRS). Of all submitted events in 2020, 97% were from hospitals, and 97% were incidents; 3 percent were serious events. The most common event was Error Related to Procedure/Treatment/Test (32%). There was a 5.3% decrease from the prior year in the number of reported events, indicating the COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on reporting activity.
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provides consumers with publicly available information on the quality of Medicare-certified hospital care through this Web site. The site includes specific information for both patients and hospitals on how to use the data to guide decision-making and improvement initiatives. Most recently, listings from the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program (HACRP) and data on Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals were added to the reports available.
Lee G, Clough OT, Walker JA, et al. Patient Safety Surg. 2021;15:11.
In an effort to continue planned and elective procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Health Service utilized alternate “clean” hospital sites which did not admit or treat patients with COVID-19. This study found that although patient concerns about undergoing elective procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic were common, the majority of these patients reported high levels of confidence and satisfaction in the precautions in place at these “clean” sites to protect their safety.
Panda N, Etheridge JC, Singh T, et al. World J Surg. 2021;45:1293-1296.
The World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist is widely used in surgical settings to prevent errors. This multinational panel representing multiple clinical specialties identified 16 recommendations for checklist content modification and implementation during the COVID-19 pandemic. These recommendations exemplify how the checklist can be adapted to meet urgent and emerging needs of surgical units by targeting important processes and encouraging critical discussions.

Harolds JA, Harolds LB. Clin Nucl Med. 2015–2021.

This monthly commentary explores a wide range of subjects associated with patient safety, such as infection prevention, surgical quality improvement, and high reliability organizations.

Cornelissen C, Call RC, Harbell MW, et al. APSF Newsletter. February 202136(1);25-27

Error disclosure is supported by a robust safety culture and a defined communication and management approach. This article discusses the engagement of anesthesiologists in the disclosure processes to ensure learning, patient centeredness, and care improvement.
Fillo KT. Bureau of Health Care Safety and Quality, Department of Public Health. Boston, MA: Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 2020.
This reoccurring report compiles patient safety data documented by Massachusetts hospitals. The 2019 numbers represent a modest increase in serious reportable events recorded in acute care hospitals, from 1066 the previous year to 1189. This presentation also includes events from ambulatory surgery centers. Older reports are also available.