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1 - 16 of 16
Jang S, Jeong S, Kang E, et al. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2020;30:17-27.
Older patients are at greater risk of experiencing adverse drug events and recent efforts have focused on avoiding prescribing high-risk medications to these patients. This study found that while implementation of a nationwide prospective drug utilization review lowered some potentially inappropriate medication prescribing among older adults in South Korea, there were no statistically significant changes in prescribing trends.
Bavel JJV, Baicker K, Boggio PS, et al. Nat Hum Behav. 2020;4:460-471.
Using a social and behavioral sciences perspective, the authors present insights for aligning behavior with recommendations from experts for managing the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact. Topics include threat perception, leadership, individual and collective interests, science communication, social context, and stress and coping.
Han S, Shanafelt TD, Sinsky CA, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2019;170:784-790.
Burnout may adversely affect patient safety as well as physician wellness. While health care organizations are increasingly focused on measuring burnout and implementing targeted interventions for improvement, the financial costs associated with physician burnout are not well described. In this study, researchers estimate that in the United States, $4.6 billion in costs are incurred from physician turnover and reduced work hours related to burnout on an annual basis. They estimate that the cost for organizations is about $7600 per physician each year. These findings suggest that physician burnout is associated with substantial economic burden. An Annual Perspective discussed burnout and its effect on patient safety.
Vento S, Cainelli F, Vallone A. World J Clin Cases. 2018;6:406-409.
Malpractice concerns can influence treatment decisions as clinicians seek to avoid errors of omission. This commentary reviews factors that contribute to defensive medicine, underscores the role the blame culture has in perpetuating this behavior, and discusses the costs to patients, physicians, and health systems.
Zimlichman E, Henderson D, Tamir O, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173:2039-2046.
Health care–associated infections (HAIs) remain a major contributor to preventable morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, despite some progress in combating certain infections. This economic analysis combined a systematic review of estimates of costs attributable to HAIs with HAI incidence data to project hospitals' total financial burden caused by these infections in adult inpatients. The authors conclude that the 5 most common HAIs result in an annual cost to the health care system of nearly $10 billion. Since the majority of HAIs are considered preventable, this finding implies that considerable savings could be achieved through more rigorous HAI prevention efforts. Although the study is limited by the heterogeneous methods of determining costs used in the original studies, other studies have shown a relatively strong business case for hospitals to invest in efforts to prevent HAIs.
Ostini R, Jackson C, Hegney D, et al. Med Care. 2011;49:24-36.
Clinicians often must have patients discontinue taking inappropriate or potentially harmful medications, in order to minimize adverse effects or eliminate drug–drug interactions. This systematic review found several potentially effective strategies for withdrawing such prescriptions.
Geneva, Switzerland: World Alliance for Patient Safety, World Health Organization. 2006-2007.
This publication shared news related to the World Health Organization's first Global Patient Safety Challenge "Clean Care is Safer Care" from 2006 to 2007.