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Bacon CT, McCoy TP, Henshaw DS. J Nurs Adm. 2021;51(1) :12-18.
Lack of communication and interpersonal dynamics can contribute to failure to rescue. This study surveyed 262 surgical staff about perceived safety climate, but the authors did not find an association between organizational safety culture and failure to rescue or inpatient mortality.  
Bach TA, Berglund L-M, Turk E. BMJ Open Qual. 2018;7:e000202.
Alarm fatigue limits the utility of physiologic monitoring devices intended to keep hospitalized patients safe. The authors conducted a literature review and interviewed experts to identify best practices to optimize device alarms. They present a step-by-step guide to alarm improvement that incorporates a human factors engineering approach.
Ghaferi AA, Dimick JB. Br J Surg. 2016;103:e47-51.
Failure-to-rescue is considered a potential contributing factor in the wide variations in surgical mortality rates. This review explored the evidence regarding the surgical mortality of older patients and found system factors that affected failure-to-rescue rates, including safety culture and access to technology. The authors suggest that teamwork and communication improvement can help reduce failure-to-rescue in this patient population.