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Guo W, Li Y, Temkin-Greener H. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2021;22:2384-2388.e1.
This study examined the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and community discharge of long-term care (LTC) residents.  Results show that two domains of PSC- teamwork and supervisor expectations and actions regarding patient safety- are significantly associated with increased likelihood of discharge to a community setting. Focusing on these domains to improve patient safety culture may also increase community discharge rates. 
Orth J, Li Y, Simning A, et al. Gerontologist. 2021;61:1296-1306.
Nursing home patient safety culture is associated with healthcare quality and patient outcomes. This large cross-sectional study of nursing homes in the United States found that speaking-up behavior and communication openness were associated with a decreased risk of in-residence death among older adults with dementia. This association was strong in nursing homes located in states with higher nursing home nurse staffing requirements.  
Ricciardi R, Shofer M. J Nurs Care Qual. 2019;34:1-3.
This commentary discusses the importance of the nurse-patient relationship and engagement with patients and their family members to improve patient safety practices. The article also provides an overview of AHRQ resources intended to facilitate engagement between providers and their patients and family members.
Deilkås ECT, Hofoss D, Husebo BS, et al. PLoS One. 2019;14:e0218244.
Researchers deployed the Norwegian version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, a measure of safety culture, across long-term care facilities and found significant variations in scores. They conclude that safety culture measurement may be useful to align resources with needs to support patient safety.
Hughes CM, Lapane KL. Int J Qual Health Care. 2006;18:281-6.
This Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)–supported study discovered a need to better address safety culture in nursing homes, drawing on findings from a self-reported survey. Investigators surveyed more than 360 nurses and 630 nursing assistants on different aspects of safety. These included overall safety perception, teamwork within units, communication, actions promoting safety, and support for patient safety. Although the findings suggest areas for improvement, the authors appropriately point out that their modified tool wasn't designed specifically for nursing homes. This setting creates unique challenges but also affects elderly patients who tend to be at higher risk for adverse events, making safety initiatives critical.
Page A; Committee on the Work Environment for Nurses and Patient Safety, Board on Health Care Services. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2004. ISBN: 9780309090674.
This AHRQ-funded Institute of Medicine study identifies solutions to problems in hospital, nursing home, and other health care organization work environments that threaten patient safety in nursing care. The report provides a blueprint of actions for all health care organizations that rely on nurses. The report's findings and recommendations address the related issues of management practices, workforce capability, work design, and organizational safety culture.