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Society for Simulation in Healthcare.
Simulation provides a safe space to observe behaviors and generate constructive feedback to enhance individual and team performance. This website provides promotional materials for an annual campaign to raise awareness of professionals that use simulation to develop teamwork, communication, and crisis management skills in health care. The 2022 observance will be held September 12-16.

A psychologically safe environment for healthcare teams is desirable for optimal team performance, team member well-being, and favorable patient safety outcomes. This piece explores facilitators of and barriers to psychological safety across healthcare settings. Future research directions examining psychological safety in healthcare are discussed.

Ottawa, ON: Canadian Patient Safety Institute; 2008.
This initative defines competency domains for safe health care and outlines educational practices to achieve them. The 2nd edition of the Patient Safety Competencies was released in 2020. 
Kjaergaard-Andersen G, Ibsgaard P, Paltved C, et al. Int J Health Care Qual. 2021;33:mzaa148.
Simulation training is used by hospitals to improve patient care. This study describes the experience of one Danish hospital shifting from simulation training at external centers to in situ training. The shift to in situ training identified several latent safety threats (e.g., equipment access, lack of closed-loop communication, out-of-date checklists) and these findings led to practice changes.  
Britton CR, Hayman G, Stroud N. J Perioper Pract. 2021;31:44-50.
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the crucial role that team and human factors play in healthcare delivery. This article describes the impact of a human factors education and training program focused on non-technical skills and teamwork (the ONSeT project) – on operating room teams during the pandemic. Results indicate that the project improved team functioning and team leader responsiveness.
Neuhaus C, Lutnæs DE, Bergström J. Cogn Technol Work. 2020;22:13-27.
In this narrative review, the authors contrast approaches to teamwork in healthcare with current concepts in safety science. The authors encourage moving past a ‘reductionist’ (reducible through information) approach to teamwork training and discuss the potential benefit from a more interdisciplinary approach towards teamwork and safety science research by integrating medical and social science disciplines, moving towards a ‘macro’ view of health care delivery, and evaluating how socioeconomic factors influence both healthcare systems and individual practitioners.
Shapiro FE, ed. Int Anesthesiol Clin. 2019;57:1-162.
This publication presents patient safety concepts for anesthesia practice, including decision aids to educate and empower patients about anesthesia choice, environmental hazards, interpersonal communication, team training, and use of technology and simulation as educational tools.
The Joint Commission. R3 Report. August 21, 2019;24:1-6.
Maternal safety in the United States is gaining momentum as a system-level patient safety concern. This report reviews the new Joint Commission Provision of Care, Treatment, and Services (PC) standards developed to improve the reliability of maternal care. Actions for improvement include patient risk assessment for conditions at admission and role-specific education for staff and providers who treat maternal patients regarding hemorrhage processes and procedures.
Loftus TJ, Hall DJ, Malaty JZ, et al. Acad Psychiatry. 2019;43:581-584.
Resident physicians complete an annual evaluation of their training program, which includes questions on their program's culture of safety. Conducted among residency programs at a single academic medical center, this analysis found that residents in programs that emphasized safety culture had higher rates of passing their board certification exams on the first attempt.
Hoonakker PLT, Wooldridge AR, Hose B-Z, et al. Intern Emerg Med. 2019;14:797-805.
Patient acuity and the need for interdisciplinary collaboration contribute to patient safety issues in trauma care. This qualitative study explored perceptions of handoff safety in pediatric trauma patients and found a high potential for information loss due to the rapidity of handoffs and the multiple disciplines involved.
Jones M, Scarduzio J, Mathews E, et al. Qual Health Res. 2019;29:1096-1108.
Simulation has been adopted as a valuable teaching tool in health care. In this study, researchers used relational dialectic theory and simulation to better understand the impact of interprofessional communication challenges on both team-based and individual disclosure of error.
Wright B, Faulkner N, Bragge P, et al. Diagnosis (Berl). 2019;6:325-334.
The hectic pace of emergency care detracts from reliability. This review examined the literature on evidence, practice, and patient perspectives regarding diagnostic error in the emergency room. A WebM&M commentary discussed an incident involving a diagnostic delay in the emergency department.
Casali G, Cullen W, Lock G. J Thorac Dis. 2019;11:S998-S1008.
Nontechnical skills, such as teamwork, communication, and leadership, are essential human-centered components of safe surgical practice. This commentary discusses contextual characteristics needed to support nontechnical skill development to improve health care outcomes. The authors recommend a cultural shift away from focusing on technical performance to one that incorporates training in nontechnical skills.
Sturrock J. Edinburgh, Scotland: The Scottish Government; May 2019. ISBN: 9781787817760.
Disrespectful and unprofessional behaviors are a common problem in health care. The report examines cultural issues at a National Health Service trust that affected the transparency needed to report disruptive behaviors and that limited conversation needed to facilitate local actions and improvement. Recommendations for the leadership, organizational, and system levels are provided to enable constructive change.
Higham H, Greig PR, Rutherford J, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28:672-686.
Nontechnical skills, such as teamwork and communication, are critical to safe care delivery, but can be difficult to measure. This systematic review examined validated approaches for assessing nontechnical skills using direct observation. Researchers analyzed 118 articles that discussed 76 unique tools for measuring nontechnical skills. This wide range of instruments assessed individuals or teams in various health care settings, either in simulation or actual clinical practice. They identified substantial variability in how these approaches were validated and whether individual studies reported the usability of each tool. The authors spotlight the need for standardization in how to develop, test, and implement assessments of nontechnical skills. A related editorial discusses the findings of this systematic review in the context of previous research and advocates for future work to standardize assessment of nontechnical skills in health care.
Krumwiede KH, Wagner JM, Kirk LM, et al. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2019;67:1273-1277.
Open disclosure of errors and adverse events is increasingly encouraged in health care. Researchers describe the development and impact of an educational program using simulation to promote learning regarding team-based error disclosure among medical students.
Hilton K, Anderson A. Harv Bus Rev. May 20, 2019.
This commentary describes how one health system worked to combat resistance to change associated with implementation of a checklist initiative. The success of the program was built on empowering team members to drive the process, clinician motivation to provide safe care, and engaging leadership. A PSNet interview with Lucian Leape discussed surgical safety checklists.
Johnson SL, Haerling KA, Yuwen W, et al. J Nurs Care Qual. 2020;35:70-76.
This randomized controlled trial compared the performance of 58 nurses on a resuscitation simulation with or without prior exposure to incivility. Nurses exposed to incivility were more likely to make an error in administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation, adding to the evidence that interpersonal interactions among health care staff affect safety.