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Tee QX, Nambiar M, Stuckey S. J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol. 2022;66:202-207.
Diagnostic errors in radiology can result in treatment delays and contribute to patient harm. This article provides an overview of the common cognitive biases encountered in diagnostic radiology that can contribute to diagnostic error, and strategies to avoid these biases, such as the use of a cognitive bias mitigation strategy checklist, peer feedback, promoting a just culture, and technology approaches including artificial intelligence (AI).

A psychologically safe environment for healthcare teams is desirable for optimal team performance, team member well-being, and favorable patient safety outcomes. This piece explores facilitators of and barriers to psychological safety across healthcare settings. Future research directions examining psychological safety in healthcare are discussed.

ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Acute care edition. February 24, 2022; 27(4):1-5; March 10, 2022; 27(5):1-5.

Disrespect for co-workers, peers, and patients degrades safety in the care environment. Part I of this article series summarizes results from a 2021 survey as the latest installment of a long-standing examination of the prevalence of disrespectful behaviors. The results found that poor behaviors are common, a wide array of  unprofessional behaviors are encountered in the workplace, and how they affect safety. Part II shares strategies to decrease the presence and impact of disrespectful behaviors in health care which include creation of confidential reporting systems and support structures.
Wyner D, Wyner F, Brumbaugh D, et al. Pediatrics. 2021;148:e2021053091.
The dismissal of parental concerns is a known contributor to medical errors in children. This story illustrates how poor communication, lack of respect, and anchoring bias  contributed to failure in the care of a boy. The authors share actions being taken by the hospital involved in the tragedy to partner with the family to improve diagnosis practices throughout their organization.
Sivarajah R, Dinh ML, Chetlen A. J Breast Imaging. 2021;3:221-230.
This article describes the Yorkshire contributory factors framework, which identifies factors contributing to safety errors across four hierarchical levels (active errors, situational factors, local working conditions, and latent factors) and two cross-cutting factors (communication systems and safety culture). The authors apply this framework to a case of missed mass on breast imaging and discuss how its use can help health systems effectively learn from error and develop systematic, proactive programs to improve safety and manage safety issues.

Gandhi TK. NEJM Catalyst. Epub 2021 May 27.

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown a spotlight on bias, disparities, and inequity in the healthcare system. The author advocates using the same strategies to reduce inequities that were used to improve patient safety: 1) culture, leadership, and governance; 2) learning systems; 3) workforce; and 4) patient engagement.
LaGrone LN, McIntyre LK, Riggle A, et al. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2020;89:1046-1053.
The authors examined contributors to error-associated deaths occurring between 1996-2004 and 2005-2014 and identified a shift from deaths occurring during the early phase of care (e.g., failed resuscitation and hemorrhage) to deaths occurring during the recovery phase (e.g., respiratory failure from aspiration). These findings demonstrate that successful implementation of system improvements can resolve process of care issues, but that ongoing evaluation is critical for continuous process improvement.
Bacon CT, McCoy TP, Henshaw DS. J Nurs Adm. 2021;51(1) :12-18.
Lack of communication and interpersonal dynamics can contribute to failure to rescue. This study surveyed 262 surgical staff about perceived safety climate, but the authors did not find an association between organizational safety culture and failure to rescue or inpatient mortality.  
Kozasa EH, Lacerda SS, Polissici MA, et al. Front Psych. 2020;11:570786.
Situational awareness during critical incidents is a key component of teamwork. This study found that a mutual care training can increase situational awareness for healthcare workers and consequently improve mental health and well-being before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Rossano JW, Berger S, Penny DJ. Prog Pediatr Cardiol. 2020;59:101315.
Disruptive behavior is a recognized threat to patient safety. This article reviews the scope of the problem, factors leading to disruptive physicians, consequences of disruptive behavior, and strategies for managing disruptive physicians.  

Horowitz SH. Washington Post. October 4, 2020.

The harm of misdiagnosis can be extended by lack of clinician recognition and acceptance of the error when a patient raises concerns. This news story shares the experience of a physician-patient whose recognition of a diagnostic mistake was initially dismissed. The author defines the repeated lack of organizational willingness to resolve the situation as a normalized deviance in health care.
Borshoff DC, Sadleir P. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2020;33:554-560.
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the delivery of anesthesia outside of operating rooms, such as in emergency departments, intensive care units, and makeshift field hospitals. This review examines challenges in maintaining patient safety while providing anesthesia services in nontraditional operating room environments.  
ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Acute Care Edition. 2020;25.
Successful development of a just culture centers on understanding different types of flawed human behavior and designing effective organizational responses to these failures. This article compares human error, at-risk behavior, and reckless behavior to suggest systems design changes for patient safety programs to generate opportunities for improvement.  
Gandhi TK, Singh H. J. Hosp Med. 2020;15:363-366.
The authors present a nomenclature to describe eight types of diagnostic errors anticipated in the COVID-19 pandemic (classic, anomalous, anchor, secondary, acute collateral, chronic collateral, strain and unintended diagnostic errors) and highlight mitigation strategies to reduce potentially preventable harm, including the use of electronic decision support, communication tactics such as visual aids, and huddles. Organizational strategies (e.g., peer-support, duty hour limits, and forums for transparent communication) and state/federal guidance around testing and monitoring diagnostic performance are also discussed.
Hendy J, Tucker DA. J Bus Ethics. 2020;2021;172:691–706.
Using the events at the United Kingdom’s Mid Staffordshire Trust hospital as a case study, the authors discuss the impact of ‘collective denial’ on organizational processes and safety culture. The authors suggest that safeguards allowing for self-reflection and correction be implemented early in the safety reporting process, and that employees be granted power to speak up about safety concerns.
Giardina TD, Royse KE, Khanna A, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2020;46:282-290.
This study analyzed self-reported adverse events captured on a national online questionnaire to determine the association between patient-reported contributory factors and patient-reported physical, emotional or financial harm. Contributory factors identified in the analysis focused on issues with health care personnel communication, fatigue, or response (e.g., doctor was slow to arrive, nurse was slow to respond to call button). These patient-reported contributory factors increased the likelihood of reporting any type of harm.
A 52-year old women presented to the emergency department with a necrotizing soft tissue infection (necrotizing fasciitis) after undergoing cosmetic abdominoplasty (‘tummy tuck’) elsewhere. A lack of communication and disputes between the Emergency Medicine, Emergency General Surgery and Plastic Surgery teams about what service was responsible for the patient’s care led to delays in treatment. These delays allowed the infection to progress, ultimately requiring excision of a large area of skin and soft tissue.
Perea-Pérez B, Labajo-González E, Acosta-Gío AE, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16.
Based on malpractice claims data in Spain, the authors propose eleven recommendations to mitigate preventable adverse events in dentistry. These recommendations include developing a culture of safety, improving the quality of clinical records, safe prescribing practices, using checklists in oral surgical procedures, and having an action plan for life-threatening emergencies in the dental clinic.
JN Learning. 2020.
Disruptive behavior is a recognized deterrent to safe communication, sharing of concerns and teamwork. This educational program highlights a study that measured the impact of unprofessional physician behavior on patient care and features Dr. William Cooper and Dr. Gerald Hickson as speakers.