Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
PSNet Original Content
Commonly Searched Resource Types
1 - 3 of 3
Tartari E, Saris K, Kenters N, et al. PLoS One. 2020;15.
Presenteeism among healthcare workers can lead to burnout and healthcare-associated infections, but prior research has found that significant numbers of healthcare workers continue to work despite having influenza-like illness. This study surveyed 249 healthcare workers and 284 non-healthcare workers from 49 countries about their behaviors when experiencing influenza-like illness between October 2018 and January 2019. Overall, 59% of workers would continue to work when experiencing influenza-like illness, and the majority of healthcare workers (89.2-99.2%) and non-healthcare workers (80-96.5%) would continue to work with mild symptoms, such as a mild cough, fatigue or sinus cold.  Fewer non-healthcare workers (16.2%) than healthcare workers (26.9%) would continue working with fever alone.
Plebani M, ed. Clinica Chimica Acta. 2009;404(1):1-86.
This collection of papers presented at an international conference on laboratory medicine focuses on efforts to reduce medical errors in laboratory practice, especially those concerning diagnostic mistakes.
World Health Organization.
This initiative provides a surgical safety checklist and related educational and training materials building on the Second Global Patient Safety Challenge vision to encourage international adoption of a core set of safety standards. Implementation of this World Health Organization’s checklist has resulted in dramatic reductions in surgical mortality and complications across diverse international hospitals. Surgical checklists have now become one of the clearest success stories in the patient safety movement, although some have described challenges to effective implementation. Dr. Atul Gawande discussed the history of checklists as a quality and safety tool in his book, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right.