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Winters BD, Slota JM, Bilimoria KY. JAMA. 2021;326:1207.
Alarm fatigue is a pervasive contributor to distractions and error. This discussion examines how, while minimizing nuisance alarms is important, those efforts need to be accompanied by safety culture enhancements to realize lasting progress toward alarm reduction.
Drawn on a Thursday, basic labs for a 10-year-old girl came back over the weekend showing a high glucose level, but neither the covering physician nor the primary pediatrician saw the results until the patient's mother called on Monday. Upon return to the clinic for follow-up, the child's glucose level was dangerously high and urinalysis showed early signs of diabetic ketoacidosis.
Thinking that the patient's glycemic control had spontaneously improved (and not realizing that the patient was continuing to receive long-acting insulin injections), a physician discontinues daily glucose checks and insulin sliding scale orders. Four days later, the patient is found unresponsive and hypoglycemic.