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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 43 Results

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2022. ISBN: 9780309686259

Nursing homes face significant patient safety challenges, and these challenges became more apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic. This report identifies key issues in the delivery of care for nursing home residents and provides recommendations to strengthen the quality and safety of care delivery, such as improved working conditions, enhanced minimum staffing standards, improving quality measurement, and strengthening emergency preparedness.
Hahn EE, Munoz-Plaza CE, Lee EA, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2021;36:3015-3022.
Older adults taking potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are at increased risk of adverse events including falls. Patients and primary care providers described their knowledge and awareness of risk of falls related to PIMs, deprescribing experiences, and barriers and facilitators to deprescribing. Patients reported lack of understanding of the reason for deprescribing, and providers reported concerns over patient resistance, even among patients with falls. Clinician training strategies, patient education, and increased trust between providers and patients could increase deprescribing, thereby reducing risk of falls. 
Rodrigo Rincón I, Irigoyen Aristorena I, Tirapu León B, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2021;21:31.
Engaging patients and families is an essential part of identifying and preventing patient safety events. This study found that an educational intervention providing patients and families with the skills necessary to audit four safe practices (patient identification, hand hygiene, blood or chemotherapy identification, and related side effects) can provide healthcare organizations with valuable quality and safety information.
Jiménez-Pericás F, Gea Velázquez de Castro MT, Pastor-Valero M, et al. BMJ Open. 2020;10:e035238.
Isolation for infection prevention and control, albeit necessary, may result in unintended consequences for patients (e.g., less attention, suboptimal documentation and communication, higher risk of preventable adverse events [AEs]). This prospective cohort study found that the incidence of all AEs and preventable AEs were significantly higher in isolated patients compared to non-isolated patients, primarily caused by healthcare-associated infections. These findings highlight the importance of training and safety culture when providing care to patients in isolation, particularly given the expanded use of isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Organizations worldwide are focusing efforts on reducing the conditions that contribute to medical error. This website provides a collection of reports and other resources that cover activities and concerns of the 37 member countries active in the organization to address universal challenges to patient safety.
J Patient Saf. 2020;16:s1-s56.
The patient safety evidence base has been growing exponentially for two decades with noted expansion into the non-acute care environment. This special issue highlights eight articles illustrating the range of practices examined in the AHRQ Making Healthcare Safer III report, including rapid response teams and failure to rescue, deprescribing practices and opioid stewardship.   
Chauhan A, Walton M, Manias E, et al. Int J Equity Health. 2020;19:118.
In this systematic review, the authors characterized patient safety events affecting ethnic minority populations internationally. Findings indicate that ethnic minority populations experience higher rates of hospital-acquired infections, complications, adverse drug events, and dosing errors. The authors identified several factors contributing to the increased risk, including language proficiency, beliefs about illness and treatment, interpreter use, consumer engagement, and interactions with health professionals.
Aldawood F, Kazzaz Y, AlShehri A, et al. BMJ Open Qual. 2020;9.
This study reports on results of completing TeamSTEPPS training by leadership and staff in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at one hospital in Saudi Arabia. The team implemented a daily safety huddle aimed at improving communication and early identification and timely resolution of patient safety issues. Over a 7-month period, 340 safety issues were addressed; the majority involved infection control and medication errors (32%), communication issues (24%) and documentation issues (17%). The authors observed that the daily huddle addressed misconceptions and misunderstandings between nursing and medical teams leading to improved care delivery.
Lee SE, Vincent C, Dahinten S, et al. J Nurs Scholarsh. 2018;50:432-440.
This secondary analysis combined survey data from individual nurses with hospital safety culture data and found that both individual characteristics such as education level and hospital characteristics such as safety culture were associated with risks of medication administration errors and falls. The authors conclude that improving safety culture should be a high priority.
Dolan SA, Arias KM, Felizardo G, et al. American journal of infection control. 2016;44:750-7.
Improper injection practices associated with point-of-care testing and treatment can contribute to the spread of health care–associated infections. This position paper outlines how clinicians and infection preventionists can reduce unsafe behaviors with surveillance, oversight, enforcement, individual skills development, and professional accountability.
Perspective on Safety August 1, 2015
Dr. Wachter is Professor and the Interim Chairman of the Department of Medicine at UCSF. We talked with him about his new book, The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine's Computer Age.
Chicago, IL: American Hospital Association Physician Leadership Forum; July 2014.
Antimicrobial stewardship has been promoted as an element of patient safety. This toolkit provides resources for hospital administrators, clinicians, and patients to help prevent overuse of antibiotics, including a readiness assessment checklist, webinars, and frequently asked questions.
Health Quality & Safety Commission New Zealand.
This Web site hosts tools and resources associated with a national campaign to augment patient care. The initiative aims to build collaborative programs across New Zealand to reduce falls, health care–associated infections, medication errors, and harm related to surgery.
WebM&M Case February 1, 2011
A man diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C was treated with interferon and ribavirin by his internist without referral for a liver biopsy or the appropriate blood tests. Treatment was continued for months despite the patient developing pancytopenia and continuing to have a high viral load, raising questions about physicians practicing outside their areas of competency.

Baker GR, ed. Healthc Q. 2010;13(Spec No):1-136.  

This is the fifth in a series of special issues devoted to exploring Canadian patient safety organizational and strategic improvement efforts. The articles highlight work related to topics including critical occurrence review, hand hygiene compliance, and effective handoffs.