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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 15 of 15 Results
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In this annual publication, AHRQ reviews the results of the National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report. The 2022 report discusses a decrease in life expectancy due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also reviews the current status of special areas of interest such as maternity care, child and adolescent mental health, and substance abuse disorders. 

National Institutes of Health.  August 11, 2022. RFA-HD-23-035.

Maternity care is increasingly being recognized as vulnerable to implicit biases and social inequities. This funding announcement aims to support initiatives that promote equity as a primary component of efforts to study preventable maternal harm in a variety of disadvantaged and ethnic populations. The application process is now closed.
St Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health.
The National Quality Forum has defined 29 never events—patient safety problems that should never occur, such as wrong-site surgery and patient falls. Since 2003, Minnesota hospitals have been required to report such incidents. The 2021 report summarizes information about 508 adverse events that were reported, representing a significant increase in the year covered. Earlier reports document a fairly consistent count of adverse events. The rise reflected here is likely due to demands on staffing and care processes associated with COVID-19. Pressure ulcers and fall-related injuries were the most common incidents documented. Reports from previous years are available.

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Maternal harm during and after pregnancy is a sentinel event. This campaign encourages women, families, and health providers to identify and speak up with concerns about maternal care and act on them. The program seeks to inform the design of support systems and tool development that enhance maternal safety.
Azam I, Gray D, Bonnett D et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; February 2021. AHRQ Publication No. 21-0012.
The National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports review analysis specific to tracking patient safety challenges and improvements across ambulatory, home health, hospital, and nursing home environments. The most recent Chartbook documented improvements in approximately half of the patient safety measures tracked. This set of tools includes summaries drawn from the reports for use in presentations to enhance distribution and application of the data.

FDA Safety Communication. MedWatch Safety Alert. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; December 7, 2020.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires patient preparation steps to protect against inadvertent harm. This announcement cautions patients and providers to assess masks being worn to protect against COVID-19 transmission for metal components that can result in patient burns during the exam. Recommendations for safety include enhanced screening to ensure masks are safe for the exam environment.

Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; September 17, 2020.

The intersection of worker well-being and safety with patient harm prevention has become apparent due to COVID-19. This report discusses five areas of importance in motivating lasting change in health care environments to support the safety of the work force. It highlights policy and strategy alignment, occupational considerations, violence reduction, psychological concerns, and physiological harms as essential elements of a robust approach to workforce safety improvement. 

London, UK: General Medical Council; September 14, 2020.

Physician caregiving effectiveness can be tested during crisis situations. This guidance shares recommendations for leaders assessing complaints against physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic to consider extenuating circumstances when determining next steps in managing the response to poor care delivery. 

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Organizations worldwide are focusing efforts on reducing the conditions that contribute to medical error. This website provides a collection of reports and other resources that cover activities and concerns of the 37 member countries active in the organization to address universal challenges to patient safety.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) support transparency through the provision of publicly available information on the quality of health care service in the United States. This portal enables access to comparative quality and safety data from doctors & clinicians, hospital, nursing home, home health, hospice, inpatient rehabilitation facilities, long-term care hospitals, and dialysis facilities to support informed consumer health care provider selection activities.

Holmes A, Long A, Wyant B, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; March 2020. AHRQ Publication No. 20-0029-EF.

This newly issued follow up to the seminal AHRQ Making Health Care Safer report (first published in 2001 and updated in 2013 critically examines the evidence supporting 47 separate patient safety practices chosen for the high-impact harms they address. It includes diagnostic errors, failure to rescue, sepsis, infections due to multi-drug resistant organisms, adverse drug events and nursing-sensitive conditions. The report discusses the evidence on cross-cutting safety practices, including safety culture, teamwork and team training, clinical decision support, patient and family engagement, cultural competency, staff education and training, and monitoring, audit and feedback. The report provides recommendations for clinicians and decision-makers on effective patient safety practices.
This Web site provides toolkits, educational modules, and an annotated bibliography to support quality improvement efforts for nephrology providers, and identifies best practice strategies for avoiding the Five Adverse Patient Safety Events in renal care.