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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 48 Results
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In this annual publication, AHRQ reviews the results of the National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report. The 2022 report discusses a decrease in life expectancy due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also reviews the current status of special areas of interest such as maternity care, child and adolescent mental health, and substance abuse disorders. 
St Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health.
The National Quality Forum has defined 29 never events—patient safety problems that should never occur, such as wrong-site surgery and patient falls. Since 2003, Minnesota hospitals have been required to report such incidents. The 2021 report summarizes information about 508 adverse events that were reported, representing a significant increase in the year covered. Earlier reports document a fairly consistent count of adverse events. The rise reflected here is likely due to demands on staffing and care processes associated with COVID-19. Pressure ulcers and fall-related injuries were the most common incidents documented. Reports from previous years are available.
World Health Organization
This global initiative raises awareness about hand hygiene as a strategy to reduce health care–associated infections. The initiative includes an annual promotional campaign that takes place on May 5. The theme for 2022 is "Unite for Safety".

Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. April 2022 – October 2023

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a persistent challenge in hospitals. This project will support the implementation of targeted hospital-acquired infection prevention initiatives building on the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) concept. The cohort that is focused on surgical services is currently recruiting participants. A cohort devoted to long-term care will begin enrolling members later in 2022.
Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services.
Detailing results of an error reporting initiative in New Jersey, these reports explain how consumers can use this information and provides tips for safety when obtaining health care. A section highlights findings related to patient safety indicators.
Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; October 2021.
This annual analysis explores rates of health care-associated infections (HAIs) reported in the United States. Data from 2020 revealed increases in central line–associated bloodstream infections and other infections while a decrease in surgical site infections. The current report also discusses the impact of COVID-19 on reporting and data submission efforts.
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; July 7 2021.
Health care–associated infections occur across various health care settings. AHRQ seeks to support large research (R01) and dissemination (R18) projects working to develop strategies and approaches for preventing and reducing health care–associated infections. Applications will be accepted on a standard submission schedule through May 27, 2025.
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provides consumers with publicly available information on the quality of Medicare-certified hospital care through this Web site. The site includes specific information for both patients and hospitals on how to use the data to guide decision-making and improvement initiatives. Most recently, listings from the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program (HACRP) and data on Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals were added to the reports available.

Holmes A, Long A, Wyant B, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; March 2020. AHRQ Publication No. 20-0029-EF.

This newly issued follow up to the seminal AHRQ Making Health Care Safer report (first published in 2001 and updated in 2013 critically examines the evidence supporting 47 separate patient safety practices chosen for the high-impact harms they address. It includes diagnostic errors, failure to rescue, sepsis, infections due to multi-drug resistant organisms, adverse drug events and nursing-sensitive conditions. The report discusses the evidence on cross-cutting safety practices, including safety culture, teamwork and team training, clinical decision support, patient and family engagement, cultural competency, staff education and training, and monitoring, audit and feedback. The report provides recommendations for clinicians and decision-makers on effective patient safety practices.
Harvey AR, Basavaraju SV, Chung K-W, et al. Transfusion. 2014;55.
Health care–associated infection is a persistent patient safety problem. This website provides resources related to a national health care–associated infection and blood safety error monitoring program that allows organizations to identify areas of weakness and track the impact of improvements.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Health Care Innovations Exchange. May 18, 2016.
This issue highlights innovations that can be applied in a variety of health care environments to prevent hospital-acquired conditions. The resources include the Chartbook on Patient Safety and checklist, decision support, and screening programs.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Priorities in Focus. March 2016.
The National Quality Strategy is part of AHRQ's ongoing efforts to enhance patient safety. This brief summarizes the results of the Partnership for Patients program and other initiatives working toward achieving the goals of the National Quality Strategy, including reducing hospital-acquired conditions, preventable readmissions, and patient harm.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; October 2015.
Catheter–associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are common complications in hospitalized patients. This toolkit was developed as part of a national implementation project to reduce rates of CAUTIs in hospitals and apply principles of the comprehensive unit-based safety program. The toolkit includes modules that focus on implementation, sustainability, and resources to help hospitals design CAUTI prevention efforts at the unit level.
Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association; 2015.
Nurses play an important role in reducing catheter–associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). This toolkit, developed as a Partnership for Patients strategy, focuses on promoting nursing behaviors to prevent CAUTIs including decreasing catheter use and improving catheter maintenance.
Battles JB, Cleeman JI, Kahn KL, Weinberg DA, eds. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; June 2014. AHRQ Publication No. 14-0003.
Health care–associated infections (HAIs) are a known contributor to preventable patient harm. This AHRQ publication offers 19 papers that explore government-funded research into HAIs, including lessons learned from the design and implementation of prevention efforts along with projects that sought to detect and measure HAI incidents to determine risks. The report discusses specific infections, including clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, as well as common conditions, such as central line-associated blood stream infections and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. A recent AHRQ WebM&M perspective reviews how infection prevention fits into a safety program.
Joint Commission. Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Joint Commission; 2014.
Safety problems, particularly medication errors and poor hand hygiene compliance, are common in nursing homes. This Web site offers an online learning module and related information about how to apply high reliability concepts to reduce health care–associated infections in long-term care settings.
Health Quality & Safety Commission New Zealand.
This Web site hosts tools and resources associated with a national campaign to augment patient care. The initiative aims to build collaborative programs across New Zealand to reduce falls, health care–associated infections, medication errors, and harm related to surgery.
Fridkin S, Baggs J, Fagan R, et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63:194-200.
Antibiotics are among the most remarkable life-saving advances of modern medicine. However, when used incorrectly these medications pose serious risks for patients due to adverse effects and the potential to cause complicated infections, including those resistant to multiple antibiotics. This national database study found that more than half of all patients discharged from a hospital in 2010 received antibiotics during their stay. Many of these antibiotics were deemed to be unnecessary, and there was wide variation seen in antibiotic usage across hospital wards. A model accounting for both direct and indirect effects of antibiotics predicted that decreasing hospitalized patients' exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics by 30% would lead to a 26% reduction in Clostridium difficile infection. The CDC recommends that all hospitals implement antibiotic stewardship programs, and this article provides core elements to guide these efforts. An AHRQ WebM&M commentary describes inappropriate antibiotic usage that resulted in a patient death. Dr. Alison Holmes spoke about infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship in a recent AHRQ WebM&M interview.