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1 - 19 of 19
Austin M; Derk J; Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; Johns Hopkins Medicine.
Measures help track gaps in process and evidence of safety improvements. This white paper examines the performance of hospitals receiving Hospital Safety Grades and the relationship between high-level recognition and preventable harm. The report estimates that a substantial number of lives could have been saved if performance metrics had been met, but concludes that even high-performing hospitals exhibit areas in need of improvement.
Canadian Patient Safety Institute; CPSI; Health Standards Organization; HSO.
This draft 5-year framework aims to guide the activities in Canada to focus action, resources, and policy development on supporting care improvement. The document is structured around five goals: people-centered care, safe care, accessible care, appropriate care, and continuous care. The authors invited Canadian patients, families, clinicians, organization leaders, and policymakers to provide input on the material to ensure its applicability across the country. 
Cullen A. Uitgeverij van Brug: The Hague, The Netherlands; 2019. ISBN: 9789065232236.
Patient stories offer important insights regarding the impact medical errors have on patients and their families. This book shares the author's experience with medical error and spotlights how lack of transparency in European health care can contribute to avoidable process failures that result in patient harm.
Gosport Independent Panel. London, England: Crown Copyright; 2018. ISBN: 9781528604062.
Organizational culture influences how comfortable individuals are with raising awareness of conditions that diminish patient safety. This independent inquiry report provides case studies and a detailed analysis of conditions that hindered nurses and families from acquiring answers about care concerns. The analysis determined factors such as hierarchy and poor physician regard for nursing expertise as persistent challenges to safety in health care.

Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK: Care Quality Commission; December 2016. CQC-356-122016.

Patients and families can contribute to improvement when they are treated with respect and openness. This report explored the extent to which those characteristics are present in National Health Service (NHS) investigations regarding patient deaths and found them to be lacking, particularly in cases involving patients with mental health conditions or learning disabilities. The authors recommend a framework to guide behaviors consistently across the NHS to improve the timeliness and quality of investigations and ensure system-level learning.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2016. AHRQ Publication No. 16-0035-2-EF.
Patient safety in ambulatory care is receiving increased attention. This guide includes case studies that explore how Open Notes, team-based care delivery, and patient and family advisory committees have shown promise as patient engagement and safety improvement mechanisms in primary care settings.
Chicago, IL: Health Research & Educational Trust; 2015.
Patient and family advisor programs have been implemented in health care as a way to incorporate the experiences of consumers into safety improvement work. This guide provides a framework to help hospitals develop partnership initiatives that focus on advisor recruitment, education, and teamwork to enhance efforts to engage patients and families in this role.
NPSF Lucian Leape Institute Roundtable on Consumer Engagement in Patient Safety. Boston, MA: National Patient Safety Foundation; March 2014.
The National Patient Safety Foundation's Lucian Leape Institute recently convened two roundtables to discuss engaging patients and families in improving patient safety. This report describes the current landscape of patient engagement efforts, along with the potential benefits and challenges. To facilitate more productive partnerships in ensuring safety, the group provides recommendations and checklists for health care leaders, clinicians, patients, families, and policymakers. They advocate for patients to be equal partners in organizational and clinician care improvement activities. Patients are encouraged to feel empowered to ask questions and to actively participate in their care plans. A recent AHRQ WebM&M perspective explores the role of patient engagement in safety.
Harrow, Middlesex, UK: The Patients Association; 2013.
This publication provides patient and family accounts of incidents involving inadequate care or harm and highlights the need for improvements recommended in a National Health Services report.
Johnson B, Abraham M, Conway J, et al. Bethesda, MD: Institute for Family-Centered Care; April 2008.
This report summarizes results from a conference of consumers, health care professionals, and administrative leaders about improving the health care system and advancing patient-centered care. Key recommendations include involving patients and families in health care leadership, through measures such as patient advisory councils and partnering with community organizations. The report also emphasizes the role of health literacy in providing patient-centered care.