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Findling MG, Zephyrin L, Bleich SN, et al. Healthc (Amst). 2022;10:100630.
Health inequities among people of color are the result of multiple systemic and clinician factors. This study shows Black and Hispanic/Latino patients who experience racism in healthcare, report worse views on the quality of their care and lower trust in their clinicians. These findings suggest that eliminating racism at the organization and clinician level may improve quality of care for patients of color.
Alpert AB, Mehringer JE, Orta SJ, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2022;Epub May 31.
Transgender patients who experience or perceive bias when receiving care may avoid or delay seeking care in the future. In this study, transgender patients reported on their experiences in viewing their electronic health record (EHR). In line with previous studies, transgender patients reported experiencing harms in several ways, such as providers using the wrong pronouns, wrong name, or wrong gender marker. The structure of the EHR (e.g., no separate fields for sex and gender) itself also created barriers to quality care.
Falcone ML, Van Stee SK, Tokac U, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e727-e740.
Adverse event reporting is foundational to improving patient safety, but many events go unreported. This review identified four key priorities in increasing adverse event reporting: understanding and reducing barriers; improving perceptions of adverse event reporting within healthcare hierarchies; improving organizational culture; and improving outcomes measurement.

Villarosa L. New York, NT: Doubleday: 2022. ISBN 9780385544887. 

Health inequities are receiving increased attention as a patient safety issue. This book examines the persistent problem of systemic racism on the health of Black patients. It summarizes the evidence on how racism affects health care and discusses strategies for improvement such as reducing gaps in implicit bias content in curriculum.
AHA Team Training. September 22 -- November 17, 2022.
The TeamSTEPPS program was developed to support effective communication and teamwork in health care. This online series will prepare participants to guide their organizations through implementation of the TeamSTEPPS program. It is designed for individuals that are new to TeamSTEPPS processes. 
Barnard C, Chung JW, Flaherty V, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;Epub Apr 28.
Organizations such as The Joint Commission and the Leapfrog Group require participating healthcare organizations to evaluate their patient safety culture, but surveys can represent a time burden on staff. An Illinois health system aimed to lessen this burden on staff by creating a shorter, revised survey. The final survey consisted of five questions with comparable measurement properties of the original 17-question survey; however, the authors caution the shorter survey will yield less detail than the longer version.
de Loizaga SR, Clarke-Myers K, R Khoury P, et al. J Patient Exp. 2022;9:237437352211026.
Parents have reported the importance of being involved in discussions with clinicians following adverse events involving their children. This study asked parents and physicians about their perspectives on inclusion of parents in morbidity and mortality (M&M) reviews. Similar to earlier studies, parents wished to be involved, while physicians were concerned that parent involvement would draw attention away from the overall purpose (e.g., quality improvement) of M&M conferences.
Kostick-Quenet KM, Cohen IG, Gerke S, et al. J Law Med Ethics. 2022;50:92-100.
Biases in decision support technologies precipitate racial inequities. This commentary discusses how algorithms in machine learning contribute to inaccuracies in the care of persons of color and the displaced. Legal actions to mitigate racial biases in decision making programs and implementation steps toward improvement are discussed.

Ferrere A, Rider C, Renerte B et al. Sloan Manag Rev. Summer 2022;39-43.

A baseline expectation in a safe organization is that employees feel comfortable and supported when sharing concerns. This article summarizes key results of a large workplace survey to identify cultural elements supporting the psychological safety required to encourage speaking up when ethical or other issues are identified in operations.
Guzek R, Goodbody CM, Jia L, et al. J Pediatr Orthop. 2022;Epub May 9.
Research has demonstrated inequitable treatment of racially minoritized patients resulting in poorer health outcomes. This study aimed to determine if implicit racial bias impacts pediatric orthopedic surgeons’ clinical decision making. While pediatric orthopedic surgeons showed stronger pro-white implicit bias compared to the US general population (29% vs. 19%), the bias did not appear to affect decision making in clinical vignettes.
Bamberger E, Bamberger P. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;Epub Apr 15.
Disruptive behaviors are discouragingly present in health care. This commentary discusses evidence examining the impact of unprofessional behaviors on safety and clinical care. The authors suggest areas of exploration needed to design reduction efforts such as teamwork, the Safety I mindset and targeting of the root influences of impropriety.

Armstrong Center for Patient Safety and Quality. September 29, 2022.

The Resilience in Stressful Events (RISE) program provides peer assistance for healthcare workers who experience psychological effects after involvement in stressful adverse care events. This virtual session presents RISE implementation education and orientation for staff to respond when peer support is needed.
Appelbaum NP, Santen SA, Perera RA, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:370-375.
Residents and trainees frequently report experiencing bullying and disrespectful behaviors in the workplace. This study explored the relationship between resident psychological safety, perceived organizational support, and humiliation. Results indicate resident perception of increased organizational support (e.g., help is available when they have a problem) reduces the negative impact of humiliation on their psychological safety.
Prudenzi A, D. Graham C, Flaxman PE, et al. Psychol Health Med. 2022;27:1130-1143.
Previous research has found that mindfulness interventions can reduce stress and burnout among physicians. This survey of 98 healthcare workers within the UK National Health Service (NHS) explored the relationship between poor wellbeing, burnout and perceived safe practice and identified a positive relationship between mindfulness processes and perceived safe practices.

Andreou A. Scientific AmericanMay 26, 2022.

Negative comments and attitudes indicate a lack of professionalism that can affect patient care. This article shares concerns about surgeon biases toward patients who are overweight and calls for clinicians to recognize the problem and address it.
Galiatsatos P, O'Conor KJ, Wilson C, et al. Health Secur. 2022;Epub Apr 26.
Stressful situations can degrade communication, teamwork and decision making. This commentary describes a program to minimize the potential impact of implicit biases in a crisis. Steps in the process include Pausing to Listen, working to Ally and Collaborate, and seeking to Empower patients and staff members.

The U.S. Surgeon General’s Advisory on Building a Thriving Health Workforce. Washington DC: Office of the Surgeon General; May 2022.

Health care staff and clinician wellbeing is known to affect safety and quality. This advisory suggests national priorities to target improvement efforts. Areas of focus include workforce shortages, system inequities and burnout.
Dyrbye LN, West CP, Sinsky CA, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5:e2213080.
Burnout is characterized as emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased sense of accomplishment at work which results in overwhelming negative emotions. Earlier studies have focused on the association of burnout with the electronic medical record and the COVID-19 pandemic, among others. This study focused on the association of physician burnout and mistreatment by patients, families and visitors. Survey respondents reported experiencing mistreatment (e.g., racially or ethnically offensive remarks) and discrimination (e.g., patients or families refusing to allow the physician to provide treatment based on their gender, race, or ethnicity) in the past year. Experiencing mistreatment or discrimination was associated with burnout.
McQueen JM, Gibson KR, Manson M, et al. BMJ Open. 2022;12:e060158.
Patients and families are important partners in improving patient safety. This qualitative study explored the experiences of patients and family members involved in adverse event reviews. The authors identified four themes (communication, trauma, learning and litigation) outline eight key recommendations to address these themes by involving patients and families in adverse event reviews.
Shiner B, Gottlieb DJ, Levis M, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;31:434-440.
Previous research has emphasized suicide prevention in inpatient mental health settings, but less is known about suicide in outpatient settings. Using longitudinal data from 2013 to 2017, this study found no relationship between overall quality of outpatient mental healthcare and suicide rates among patients treated by the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system.