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1 - 20 of 71
Gilbert GL, Kerridge I. BMC Health Serv Res. 2022;22:504.
Hospital transmission of COVID-19 has necessitated review of organization infection prevention and control (IPC) policies and practices. This study, conducted before the pandemic, compared IPC attitudes and practices of nurses and physicians, and how these differences affect interpersonal relationships. Both professions described unflattering and stereotypical behaviors of the other (i.e., doctors are unaware or disdainful of IPC; “bossy” nurses).  Many IPC policies implemented during the pandemic, such as encouraging all healthcare workers to speak up about infection prevention breaches, were accepted by both professions, and the authors recommend seizing on this interprofessional unity to continue adherence to all IPC policies.
Etheridge JC, Moyal-Smith R, Sonnay Y, et al. Int J Surg. 2022;98:106210.
Non-technical skills such as communication, teamwork, decision-making, and situational awareness are responsible for a significant proportion of surgical errors. The COVID-19 pandemic increased the stress in the operating room, associated with increased risk of exposure and shortage of resources. This study compared pre- and post-COVID direct observations during live operations and found that non-technical skills were equivalent; there was a small, but statistically significant, improvement in teamwork and cooperation skills.

Health Service Journal. September 15-16, 2022. Manchester Central Convention Complex, Manchester UK.

Patient safety is challenged worldwide due to the daily complexity of care. This session will focus on never events. Areas of specific exploration will include what factors in the environment enable never events, the value of proactive assessment of practice to prevent never events, and the viability of never event classification schemes. 
Hennus MP, Young JQ, Hennessy M, et al. ATS Sch. 2021;2:397-414.
The surge of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic forced the redeployment of non-intensive care certified staff into intensive care units (ICU). This study surveyed both intensive care (IC)-certified and non-IC-certified healthcare providers who were working in ICUs at the beginning of the pandemic. Qualitative synthesis identified five themes related to supervision; quality and safety of care; collaboration, communication, and climate; recruitment, scheduling and team composition, and; organization and facilities. The authors provide recommendations for future deployments.
Leibner ES, Baron EL, Shah RS, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e810-e815.
During the first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, a rapid redeployment of noncritical care healthcare staff was necessary to meet the unprecedented number of patients needing critical care. A New York health system developed a multidisciplinary simulation training program to prepare the redeployed staff for new roles in the intensive care unit (ICU). The training included courses on management of a patient with acute decompensation with COVID-19, critical care basics for the non-ICU provider, and manual proning of a mechanically ventilated patient.
Ellis R, Hardie JA, Summerton DJ, et al. Surg. 2021;59:752-756.
Many non-urgent, non-cancer surgeries were postponed or canceled during COVID-19 surges resulting in a potential loss of surgeons’ “currency”. This commentary discusses the benefits of, and barriers to, dual surgeon operating as a way to increase currency as elective surgeries are resumed.

Bever L, Chiu A. Washington Post. September 16, 2021. 

Throughout the COVID pandemic, patients have shown reluctance to seek medical care, which contributes to delayed diagnoses and treatments for non-COVID conditions. This news story suggests actions for patients to take to keep themselves safe from harm while accessing care during uncertain times.
Dickinson KL, Roberts JD, Banacos N, et al. Health Secur. 2021;19:s14-s26.
The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the continued existence of structural racism and its disproportionate impact on the health of communities of color. This study examines the experiences of non-White and White communities and the negative impact of structural racism on the non-White communities. The authors call for bold action emphasizing the need for structural changes.  
Petrone G, Brown L, Binder W, et al. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2021;Epub Mar 26.
As COVID-19 infections surged worldwide, many states set up alternative care hospitals (ACH), or field hospitals. Prior to opening a Rhode Island ACH, four multi-disciplinary in situ simulation scenarios were run to perform system testing. This in situ simulation was successful in identifying patient safety concerns, resulting in equipment modification and protocol changes.
Adelman JS, Gandhi TK. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:331-333.
The full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient safety in the healthcare system is still unknown. New patient safety concerns have been introduced, and existing concerns have been exacerbated. The authors suggest several high reliability strategies to prevent and learn from patient safety hazards, including transparency, a culture of safety, and continuous analysis of errors.
Sands K, Blanchard J, Grubbs K, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2021;47:327-332.
This article describes the development of the Universal Protection Framework, which builds upon traditional infection prevention practices and consists of four domains (infection prevention, access control, distancing, and patient flow) supported by communication and education. The framework was implemented in one large health system with high levels of compliance, particularly for handling of personal protective equipment (PPE), cohorting of COVID-19 patients, facility access controls and employee exposure monitoring.
Waldron KM, Schenkat DH, Rao KV, et al. Am J Health-Syst Pharmacy. 2021;78:552-555.
Health systems have needed to rapidly adapt processes to optimize safe care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article describes one pharmacy department’s experience integrating emergency preparedness and disaster management principles during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the use of a department-specific incident command and delineation of responsibilities among pharmacy leadership (e.g., who monitors PPE inventory, medication distribution, workflows).
Thompson R, Kusy M. Nurs Adm Q. 2021;45:135-141.
Effective leadership is essential to team performance and organizational safety. This article discusses the role of team leaders on team performance during the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors review common mistakes made during the pandemic (such as broken trust or ignoring disruptive behaviors) and lessons learned to help build strong, cohesive teams.

Boston Children’s Hospital. April 15, 2021. 

A core tenant of patient safety improvement is to draw from the experiences of a range of high-risk industries to address system safety barriers. This session focused on adaptations that health care has made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Don Berwick is among the featured speakers.

In this PSNet Annual Perspective, we review key findings related to improvement strategies when communicating with patients and different structured communication techniques to improve communication across providers. Lessons learned from innovative approaches explored under COVID-19 that could be considered as usual care resumes are also discussed.

Elbeddini A, Almasalkhi S, Prabaharan T, et al. J Pharm Policy Pract. 2021;14:10.
Medication reconciliation can improve patient safety, but prior research has documented challenges with implementation. Researchers conducted a gap analysis to inform the development of standardized medication reconciliation framework for use across multiple healthcare settings to reduce harm, including during the COVID-19 pandemic. Five key components were identified: (1) pharmacy-led medication reconciliation team, (2) patient education and involvement, (3) complete and accurate medication history, (4) admission and discharge reconciliation, and (5) interprofessional communication.
Takizawa PA, Honan L, Brissette D, et al. FASEB Bioadv. 2020;3:175-181.
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to wide-ranging changes in the health care system. This article describes one academic hospital’s experience adapting in-person team-based clinical and interprofessional training during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Mulchan SS, Wakefield EO, Santos M. J Ped Psychol. 2021;46:138-143.
Implicit and explicit bias can reduce the effectiveness and safety of care. Based on a review of the literature, the authors conclude that the strain placed on provider resources, staff, and supplies by the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate implicit bias among pediatric providers. The authors discuss implicit bias at the individual, organizational, educational, and research levels, provide specific calls to action for pediatric healthcare providers, and discuss the role of pediatric psychologists in supporting other providers.
Pan D, Rajwani K. Simul Healthc. 2020;16:46-51.
Simulation training is employed by hospitals to improve patient care. This article describes one hospital’s experience implementing simulation training during the COVID-19 pandemic to help refine protocols, facilitate practice changes, uncover safety gaps, and train redeployed healthcare workers.