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Lefosse G, Rasero L, Bellandi T, et al. J Patient Saf Risk Manag. 2022;27:66-75.
Reducing healthcare-acquired infections is an ongoing patient safety goal. In this study, researchers used structured observations to explore factors contributing to healthcare-related infections in nursing homes in one region of Italy. Findings highlight the need to improve the physical care environment (e.g., room ventilation), handwashing compliance, and appropriate use of antibiotics.

Stein L, Fraser J, Penzenstadler N et al. USA Today. March 10, 2022.

Nursing home residents, staff, and care processes were particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. This collection of resources examines data and documentation involving one nursing home chain to reveal systemic problems that contributed to failure. It shares family stories that illustrate how COVID affected care in long-term care environments.
Residents living in nursing homes or residential care facilities use common dining and activity spaces and may share rooms, which increases the risk for transmission of COVID-19 infection. This document describes key patient safety challenges facing older adults living in these settings, who are particularly vulnerable to the effects of the virus, and identifies federal guidelines and resources related to COVID-19 prevention and mitigation in long-term care. As of April 13, 2020, the Associated
Huetteman E. Kaiser Health News. 2020;August 12.
Health care workers are known to work while unwell due to stigma, commitment, and personal finances. This article discusses presenteeism in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It discusses challenges for individuals who feel organizational pressure to return to work despite health concerns for themselves, their families, and their patients.   
Rosa WE, Schlak AE, Rushton CH. Nurs Manage. 2020;51:28-34.
These authors discuss the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on burnout and moral distress among nurses and outline several recommendations to support nurses, promote resilience, and maintain patient outcomes during and after the pandemic.
Parush A, Wacht O, Gomes R, et al. J Med Internet Res. 2020;22:e19947.
This study surveyed healthcare professionals in Israel and Portugal to identify key human factors that influence the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when caring for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Respondents attributed difficulties in wearing PPE to discomfort, challenges in hearing and seeing, and doffing. Analyses also found an association between PPE discomfort and situational awareness, but this association reflected difficulties in communication (e.g., hearing and understanding speech).
Hado E, Friss Feinberg L. J Aging Soc Policy. 2020;32:410-415.
These authors discuss the role of family caregivers during the COVID-19 pandemic and suggest avenues to support the relationship between families and residents of long-term care facilities, including strengthening communicating channels, activating family councils, and utilizing gerontological social work students.

Baltimore MD: University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; 2020.

Medication management has been affected in a variety of settings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This guide highlights strategies to ensure safe medication delivery in long term care. Tactics highlighted include medication discontinuation and alignment of medication administration times.
Dzau VJ, Kirch D, Nasca TJ. N Engl J Med. 2020;383:513-515.
This commentary discusses the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on the physical, emotional, and mental health on the healthcare workforce and outlines five high-priority actions at the organizational- and national level to protect the health and wellbeing of the healthcare workforce during and after the pandemic.  

National Academy of Medicine. April-June 2020.

Nursing homes are care environments that are particularly challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic. This webinar series covered topics such as keeping nursing home residents and the staff that care for them safe, practice integration in skilled nursing facilities, communication and collaboration in times of crisis, testing and SARS-CoV-2 transmission prevention tactics.

Ellis B, Hicken M. CNN. May 14, 2020.

Long-term care and skilled nursing facilities care for a patient population particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. This article discusses an analysis of a large nursing home system and gaps in its workforce safety program. Problems highlighted included communication practices that fall short of what is needed to assure staff safety as they care for nursing home residents.
Am Geriatr Soc. 2020;68:908-911.
This policy brief presents the American Geriatric Society’s recommendations for caring for patients with COVID-19 in nursing homes and long-term care facilities. Recommendations focus on the production and distribution of personal protective equipment (PPE), patient transfer between hospitals and nursing homes, public health planning, workforce issues, and payment and tax relief for nursing homes. The brief reflects federal guidance as of April 4, 2020.

Shaprio J. National Public Radio. April 15, 2020.

Access to care has been strained by the COVID-19 pandemic. This radio segment discusses how implicit biases can affect care of patients with disabilities. It highlights how preconceptions about this patient population could limit their access to treatments should they become ill.
Gaur S, Dumyati G, Nace DA, et al. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2020;41:729-730.
This commentary discusses the provision of safe care in long-term care settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors propose the following measures to ensure the safety of long-term care patients: facilities should only accept patients with COVID-19 infections if they can provide effective airborne isolation; patients recovering from COVID-19 need to have 2 negative tests on 2 consecutive days, as well as remain fever-free without mediation for at least 48 hours and not require ventilatory support that generates aerosols; facilities should screen potential admissions for typical and atypical signs and symptoms of COVID-19, and; facilities that are currently COVID-19 naïve should not accept any new admissions for whom there may be a concern for COVID-19.