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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 61 Results
Dowell D, Ragan KR, Jones CM, et al. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2022;71:1-95.
In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released guidelines for safe opioid prescribing for chronic pain. Based on an updated evidence review, the CDC has revised the guidelines and released the Clinical Practice Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Pain - United States, 2022, include recommendations for outpatient acute, subacute, and chronic opioid use. The twelve recommendations fall into four broad categories: determining whether or not to initiate opioids for pain; selecting opioids and determining opioid dosages; deciding duration of initial opioid prescription and conducting follow-up; and assessing risk and addressing potential harms of opioid use. The CDC will update and develop tools and resources to support dissemination of these guidelines. The recommendations do not apply to pain related to sickle cell disease or cancer or to patients receiving palliative or end-of-life care, or for patients in the emergency department or admitted to the hospital.

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Maternal harm during and after pregnancy is a sentinel event. This campaign encourages women, families, and health providers to identify and speak up with concerns about maternal care and act on them. The program seeks to inform the design of support systems and tool development that enhance maternal safety.
Curated Libraries
January 14, 2022
The medication-use process is highly complex with many steps and risk points for error, and those errors are a key target for improving safety. This Library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on medication and drug errors. Included resources explore understanding harms from preventable medication use, medication safety...

Zirger JM, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fed Register. September 27, 2021;86:53309-53312.

Tracking healthcare-associated infection (HAI) data aids in national, regional, and organizational design of HAI improvement efforts. This notice calls for public comment on the continuation of the National Healthcare Safety Network HAI information collection process. The comment period closes November 26, 2021.
NIOSH [2015]. NIOSH training for nurses on shift work and long work hours. By Caruso CC, Geiger-Brown J, Takahashi M, Trinkoff A, Nakata A. Cincinnati, OH: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2015-115 (Revised 10/2021)
Nurse fatigue has been associated with diminished decision-making skills that can contribute to patient harm. This online training program for clinicians and administrators will explore hazards related to nurse fatigue and provide strategies to address behaviors and systems that increase these risks.
Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; October 2021.
This annual analysis explores rates of health care-associated infections (HAIs) reported in the United States. Data from 2020 revealed increases in central line–associated bloodstream infections and other infections while a decrease in surgical site infections. The current report also discusses the impact of COVID-19 on reporting and data submission efforts.
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, collaborative initiatives, teamwork, and trigger tools.

AHA Team Training and Project Firstline. Chicago, IL: American Hospital Association, Center for Disease Control and Prevention; July 2021.

Problems in communication are common contributors to patient care mistakes. This toolkit draws from experience with the TeamSTEPPS model to highlight best practices in the use of huddles, debriefs and other teamwork improvement strategies.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ethnic and social inequities have a substantial impact on the safety and effectiveness of health care. This US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiative provides access to science, CDC actions, and expert insights on the value of public health efforts to reduce the impact of systemic racism on health in the United States.
Czeisler MÉ, Marynak K, Clarke KEN, et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2020;69:1250-1257.
This nationwide survey of U.S. adults found that many respondents (40.9%) have avoided routine, urgent and emergent medical care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Avoidance of urgent or emergency care was significantly higher among unpaid caregivers for adults; persons with underlying medical conditions; persons with health insurance; non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, or Latino adults; young adults; and persons with disabilities.
Dora AV, Winnett A, Jatt LP, et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2020;69:651-655.
This report describes an outbreak of COVID-19 among residents at one skilled nursing facility in Los Angeles between March 28 and April 23, 2020 and highlights the high asymptomatic prevalence of COVID-19 and unique risk to residents and staff at long-term care facilities. Authors emphasize that universal and serial RT-PCR testing, rapid isolation, and cohorting can disrupt transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
Petersen EE, Davis NL, Goodman D, et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019;68:423-429.
Maternal safety is a critical concern in health care, and prior studies have discussed racial and ethnic disparities in patient safety. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examined trends in pregnancy-related deaths between 2011 and 2015. This analysis found that black women had rates of maternal mortality 3.5 times that of white women; Native American/Alaska Native women had rates 2.5 times higher than white women. About 60% of deaths were deemed preventable, and leading causes included cardiovascular events such as venous thromboembolism, infection, and hemorrhage. The study team recommends implementing interventions at health system, provider, community, and patient levels to prevent maternal mortality. A recent Annual Perspective on maternal safety touched on the persistently higher death rates among black women and discussed national initiatives to improve outcomes in maternity care.
CDC Vital Signs. May 7, 2019.
Maternal morbidity and mortality is a worldwide patient safety problem. This analysis describes the prevalence of pregnancy-related death and areas of concern during pregnancy, at delivery, and up to a year postpartum. It reports that 60% of these deaths are preventable and provides suggestions for families, clinicians, and systems to reduce risks.
Scholl L, Seth P, Kariisa M, et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018;67:1419-1427.
This Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report provides drug and opioid overdose death figures for 2016. The rate of overdose deaths continues to rise, with the largest increase due to synthetic opioids such as fentanyl. The report calls for enhancing prevention and response measures, including the use of naloxone.
Meyer AND, Thompson PJ, Khanna A, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018;25:841-847.
Clinical decision support is a widely recommended patient safety strategy. This study examined whether a mobile application created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention improved clinician decision-making about anticoagulation test ordering for simulated case vignettes. Each participating physician completed a series of vignettes; half used the application and half did not. When using the application, physicians demonstrated greater diagnostic accuracy and confidence, and they needed less time to complete each vignette. The authors suggest that mobile applications may be useful for providing decision support.
Kossover-Smith RA, Coutts K, Hatfield KM, et al. Am J Infect Control. 2017;45:1018-1023.
Unsafe injection practices in health care settings have led to more than 50 disease outbreaks in the past 20 years. In this cross-sectional, voluntary survey across 8 states, 12% of responding physicians stated that needles were reused between patients in their workplace. Nearly 8% of physicians thought this was an acceptable practice. The authors discuss implications for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's One & Only safe injection campaign.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CDC.
The opioid crisis is a persisting patient safety problem. One approach to prevent misuse of opioids is to raise awareness of the addictive nature of the medication. This national campaign enlists communities and individual clinicians to provide patient education to address the opioid epidemic. The website offers videos and other resources to assist community-level efforts to reduce risk for opioid addiction.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dialysis is a common procedure that carries risks if not performed correctly. This initiative represents a collective effort that aims to develop, share, and test a set of interventions and tools to ensure the safety of dialysis.
Harvey AR, Basavaraju SV, Chung K-W, et al. Transfusion. 2014;55.
Health care–associated infection is a persistent patient safety problem. This website provides resources related to a national health care–associated infection and blood safety error monitoring program that allows organizations to identify areas of weakness and track the impact of improvements.
Berríos-Torres SI, Umscheid CA, Bratzler DW, et al. JAMA Surg. 2017;152.
Surgical site infections are a common hospital-acquired condition. This clinical guideline reviews the literature and gathers expert opinion to identify generalizable evidence-based strategies to reduce surgical site infections. The authors highlight antimicrobial, preoperative hygiene, glycemic control, and skin preparation procedures to prevent infection.